Posts tagged ‘Phi Delta Theta’

Some Autumn Shots of University Park

I heard on the radio this morning the ridiculous news that fall starts tonight at 11:09 p.m. First of all, since when does fall start at such a seemingly random hour? Am I the last person in the world to know about this? And secondly, can we all agree that summer was so short as to be practically nonexistent?

Anyway, here at University Park we’re starting to see the first hints of the leaves turning, and it reminded me of some campus photos I took last October that I never quite got around to posting. I thought today would be as good a day as any to post them.

The way the photos came about was this: Last fall I wrote about having toured the new Joel N. Myers Weather Center in Walker Building, and that in turn got me interested in seeing the weather equipment up on the building’s roof (which was not, alas, part of the tour). So I contacted Jon Nese ’83, ’85, ’89g of the meteorology faculty and asked him if he could show me the roof sometime.

A week or so later, we went up there, and Jon explained to me the rain gauges and various other pieces of equipment—all of which were cool, but not quite as cool as the view from the roof. In the short slide show below you’ll see the shots I took of Mount Nittany, Deike Building, Old Main, the IST Building, and the now-defunct Phi Delta Theta fraternity house. Plus a few shots of Jon and the weather equipment. Enjoy.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

(Click on any photo if you want to stop the slide show and advance the images manually.)

Tina Hay, editor

September 22, 2010 at 8:49 am 1 comment

Phi Delta Theta Demolition Update

Here are some updated photos of the Phi Delta Theta house at about 10:15 this morning. The first photo is looking out over the back of the house from the IST Building’s third floor. Beyond the blue fence is Burrowes Road and the Hosler and Deike Buildings.

Here’s a shot of what is left of the back of the house from ground level.

This last photo is of what used to be the front of the house. It was shot from Burrowes, notice the IST Building in the back.

To see previous photos of the demolition, check out Tina’s posts from last Saturday and last Thursday.

Jessie Knuth, graphic designer

August 17, 2010 at 3:40 pm 1 comment

It Wasn’t Built in a Day…

…so I guess I can see why it would take more than a day to demolish the Phi Delta Theta house. When I took a few photos of the beginning of the demolition on Thursday morning, I thought that the whole house would be rubble by the end of the day. I was wrong. (And, in retrospect, I now remember Physical Plant spokesperson Paul Ruskin ’69, ’71g telling me that the demolition was scheduled to take the better part of a week.)

The photo above shows the state of things as of Saturday morning around 9:00 a.m. On the left-hand side of the image (click to see the photo bigger) you can see some of the pillars that once graced the front porch of the fraternity. For a comparison shot, see this photo I took in February of 2009.

Tina Hay, editor

August 14, 2010 at 9:36 am Leave a comment

Phi Delta Theta House Comes Down Today

Phi-Delta-Theta

Workers have begun tearing down the former Phi Delta Theta house at the corner of Burrowes and Pollock on campus. I stopped by a little while ago, and they had taken down part of the back of the building (see photo below), and before the day is out I imagine the rest of the building will follow.

The fraternity’s national headquarters closed down the Penn State chapter in 2007, citing a number of policy violations—including the serving of alcohol (nationwide, the fraternity has been dry since 2000). This past spring, Penn State bought the property for $1.75 million. The plan is to keep the area as green space.

Phi-Delta-ThetaI always thought that the house was a good-looking building, and it’s also got some history to it: It dates to about 1905. But it hasn’t exactly been, shall we say, well cared for. And this past May, right at the end of the spring semester, it was severely vandalized. Penn State officials say the building is in “a significant state of disrepair” and that repairs or renovations would cost millions.

I’ll try to stop up later today and get another photo or two of the demolition when it’s a little farther along.

Tina Hay, editor

August 12, 2010 at 9:36 am 3 comments

More Wide Views

We had a nice sunny day on Sunday (here in central Pennsylvania, you notice those rare sunny days) and I took my new ultra-wide-angle lens out for some more experimenting on campus. I’m still feeling my way—you get very different results depending on whether you’re shooting from a standing, kneeling, or lying position, and depending on how you tilt the camera. Anyway, here are a few shots from Sunday.

The Beta Theta Pi house on Burrowes Road. I'm not sure in what month they actually take down their Christmas wreaths.

The Beta Theta Pi house on Burrowes Road. I'm not sure in what month they actually take down their Christmas wreaths. Click on photo for bigger version.

Phi Delta Theta. Currently embroiled in a dispute with the University (http://live.psu.edu/story/36338/rss30).

Phi Delta Theta. Currently embroiled in a dispute with the University (http://live.psu.edu/story/36338/rss30).

The IST Building, which is definitely funky, but not THIS funky. It's partly distortion from the wide-angle lens.

The IST Building, which is definitely funky, but not THIS funky. Some of it is distortion from the wide-angle lens.

The plaza at the intersection of Shortlidge and Pollock. The two-story building in the center of the photo is Ritenour.

The plaza at the intersection of Shortlidge and Pollock. The two-story building in the center of the photo is Ritenour; to its right, the new Chemistry Building.

The lens doesn't always create wacky curves. It can also straighten things out. This is the former Atherton Hall, along College Avenue.

Schreyer Honors College headquarters, in the former Atherton Hall, along College Avenue.

Tina Hay, editor

February 17, 2009 at 5:59 pm 5 comments


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