Posts tagged ‘Nittany Lion basketball’

One of “The Fellas” Who Made an Unlikely Mark

The January/February issue of the Penn Stater includes a short obituary of Kevin Cadle ’77, a former Nittany Lion basketball player who went on to unlikely fame in the UK as both a successful coach, and, later, the TV face of American football and basketball in Britain. Cadle, who died in October, left an impressive legacy on both sides of the Atlantic. This video put together by Sky Sports gives a sense of how much he’ll be missed by friends and fans alike.

We learned of Cadle’s passing from Darryl Anderson ’00, his longtime friend and former teammate. Anderson wrote the remembrance below, which we’re happy to share here:

The last time we were in State College together it was a hot summer day in 2016. We just had lunch with the “Fellas,” a group of college friends/former teammates, and “Coach” Don Ferrell, organized by Kevin Cadle. Kevin and I decided to run down to College Avenue and buy some Penn State gear, at the behest of our wives who had decided that we literally wore our Penn State t-shirts, sweat pants etc. until they were threadbare, and it was time to upgrade our wardrobe.

As I started the car, Kevin asked me not to turn on the A/C but to roll down the window, indicating that the weather in London (his adopted city for the last four decades) was so often chilly that he loved the chance for some summer heat, prompting a rather profane comment from me. But it emphasized his Buffalo roots vs his London celebrity lifestyle, and resulted in a big smile and mutual chuckle as we proceeded on our mission. He never forgot where he came from or those that he met along the way. It centered him.

Kevin Cadle was an absolute success in his craft. He graduated from Penn State and got a master’s in education from Texas A&M. He was a broadcaster for Sky Sports, presenter for the NFL in Europe for 16 years, and professional basketball coach for 18 years, with 27 titles and eight coach of the year awards. He was the 1992 UK Olympic qualifying coach. He wrote an autobiography, “The Cadle Will Rock.”

He was a father, son, husband, businessman, mentor, world traveler and friend. A Renaissance man with the savvy of an inner city/urban black kid, blended with the formal education, life exposure and experiences that four years in State College provides. He had the mixture of honesty with a great sense of humor, empathy with passion. Tom Doaty ’77, a backcourt teammate, emphasized Kevin’s honesty and directness: “You may not want to hear what he had to say but you knew he was telling you the truth.”

He understood the struggle of African-Americans and was proud of his heritage. He emphasized what hard work and discipline can do to move us all forward, regardless of our socioeconomic beginnings, our race or ethnicity. He did not accept “half stepping” from anyone—his email signature ended with “Never accept good over best.”

Our teammate Bobby Kinzer ’80 who also played for Kevin in Europe, gave me the news of Kevin’s passing. I did not cry until today writing this (then I wept like a baby) …. I will miss you my brother… the “fellas” know sports and educational opportunity introduced us…. Kevin Cadle kept us together.  “We Are”

Cadle, who lived in suburban London, died unexpectedly on October 15, 2017. He is survived by his wife Lorraine, daughter Toia and mother Loretta.

Ryan Jones, deputy editor

 

December 19, 2017 at 6:41 pm Leave a comment

Tim Frazier, Playing Like He Means It

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Sitting quietly at his locker on Tuesday night, 90 minutes before tip-off, Tim Frazier was busy with one of the NBA’s most enduring pregame rituals: filling out envelopes.

Frazier was in Philadelphia with the rest of the New Orleans Pelicans for a mostly meaningless late-season games against the Sixers; “meaningless,” of course, being a relative term. Neither team will make the playoffs this season, so it didn’t mean much in the standings. But for Frazier ’13, ’14, a second-year player looking to establish himself as an NBA regular, every game—every possession, really—is a chance to prove himself worthy. For guys like Frazier, every game matters.

He didn’t seem to be feeling the pressure before the game, filling out envelopes for the comp tickets he was leaving for some friends. Times like these, Frazier looks like a seasoned vet, calmly handling one of the NBA’s more mundane tasks. His focus now is on showing that same sort of veteran composure and production on the court.

His story should be familiar to Penn State fans: Undrafted in 2014, he spent most of the 2014-15 season in the NBA’s developmental league, where he was nothing short of dominant, winning D-League Rookie of the Year and MVP honors. That effort earned him brief call-ups last season with the Sixers and Blazers, and it was Portland that signed him for the 2015-16 season. But the Blazers’ backcourt depth mostly relegated Frazier to the bench this season, and he went back to the D-League, nearly averaging a triple-double for the Maine Red Claws in eight D-League games.

Signed by the injury-ravaged Pelicans three weeks ago, he’s been better than good so far in New Orleans, posting a career-high 19 points and 13 assists last weekend in a win over Brooklyn. He was slated to start against the Sixers, the team that gave him his first, brief NBA opportunity. In the locker room pregame, seeing a familiar face from his days at Penn State—where he finished his career as the Nittany Lions’ all-time assist leader and one of the most complete players in program history—he’s happy to take a minute to look back, and to look ahead.

He says he keeps as close an eye on his alma mater as his schedule will allow, talking regularly with coach Patrick Chambers, who made the drive down to Philly for the game. He’s heard plenty about the Nittany Lions’ incoming recruiting class, potentially the best in program history, and a group loaded with Philly talent. He speaks regularly with teammates from his time in Portland; he and Damian Lillard, the Blazers’ star point guard with whom Frazier became particularly close, are in daily contact, and he says Lillard will watch his games and offer advice and critiques.

It’s suggested that the biggest difference in Frazier’s game this season is simple confidence. “So much,” he concurs, his eyes going big with acknowledgment. Unlike the rookie who was called up late last season and thrown into the NBA fire, he understands the importance of looking for his own shot. His on-court unselfishness worked against him at times last season, as he almost never looked for his own shot, even when left open. As he showed with that 19-point outburst last weekend, or his 10-point first quarter against the Sixers Tuesday night, it’s one of the many lessons Frazier has learned since.

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He also had five assists in the first quarter Tuesday, and for all practical purposes he was the best player on the floor as the Pelicans built an eight-point lead. But they lost it when he went to the bench for a breather, and as the game went on, the Pelicans looked every bit like a team with its top six scorers out injured, fielding a roster of unfamiliar call-ups in their place. The Sixers ended up running away with the game, winning 107-93. Frazier’s stat line—12 points, 9 assists, 6 rebounds, and 3 steals—was probably the most impressive on the team.

His contract with New Orleans guarantees him a spot through the end of the regular season, now just a week away. Asked if he has a hunch about what happens next, Frazier is blunt: “July 1,” he says. That’s the date NBA teams can begin negotiating with free agents. Until then, he’ll keep looking for chances to make his case.

Ryan Jones, deputy editor

April 6, 2016 at 3:08 pm 3 comments


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