In Tune with the State College Music Scene

The cover story for our March/April issue celebrates some of the alumni who have shaped the sound of State College nightlife for the past 30 years. You can read more about them below, and—assuming you can’t get to Zeno’s or the Phyrst this weekend—relive the sights and sounds of some of your favorites live on stage.

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Molly Countermine ’02g

Born in State College but raised in the South, Countermine never lost her connection to Happy Valley: Her parents, Terry Countermine ’73g and Sherry Corneal ’76, ’87, ’90g, were around for the founding of the Phyrst Phamly. She grew up playing music, first with her father and then in bands in college, then went to grad school at West Chester and “kind of put it on the back burner.” When she returned to her hometown in her late 20s, she was eager to get back into it.

“I think I was back two months when I joined the Phyrst Phamly,” she says. “Around that same time, I started teaching at Penn State.”

Today, it’s hard to say which gig Countermine — that’s her on our March/April cover — is better known for: Professor of Health and Human Development, or vocalist in some of downtown’s favorite bands. While teaching and eventually going back to school to get her PhD, Countermine established her own legacy on the local scene, as a member of both Pure Cane Sugar and Ted McCloskey & the Hi-Fi’s, as well as her own band, Maxwell Strait. She left Pure Cane Sugar in 2015—as a full-time professor and mother of three kids, the schedule simply became too much—but still plays regularly in town.

And each semester, she still teaches HDFS 129: Intro to Human Development to 600 undergrads, many of whom eventually end up dancing and singing along at her gigs.

“Every week, I get somebody at the Phyrst who was in my class when there were 18, and now they’re 21, and they’re like, ‘Oh my god!’ It’s fun,” she says. “I’m not just this distant teacher—I’m this person who is doing what I love to do outside of the classroom. I get a little bit of credibility because of that.”

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Mark Ross ’83

The son of a coal miner and musician from southwestern PA, Mark Ross grew up with twin loves: baseball and music. Baseball was the priority through his high school days, but around the time he headed to Penn State, he saw a trio of memorable shows in Pittsburgh: The Nighthawks, the Fabulous Thunderbirds, and a hot young Texas guitarist named “Little” Stevie Vaughan. “I bought their records off the bandstand, took one of my dad’s old guitars, and taught myself to play off these records,” Ross says. “It was watching guys who were better than me, trying to mimic them.”

After cutting his teeth with a number of State College bands, Ross teamed up with Tonya Browne ’85 to form Queen Bee and the Blue Hornet Band. The combination of Browne’s powerful voice and Ross’s hot-shot guitar playing made the bluesy quintet one of the most popular bands in town through the late ’90s, and also led to gigs on international festival bills alongside the likes of B.B. King.

Today, Ross plays a mellower style with Miss Melanie & the Valley Rats, but he’s still an integral part of the local scene—and not just as a player. He also owns the State College music store Alley Cat Music, and designs custom guitars and amps as co-owner of PennTone. He’s also a former children’s music specialist at Penn State’s Child Development Lab, and has written and recorded his own children’s book and accompanying CD.

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Bill Filer ’76

He’s a rarity on the local scene: A guy who’s made a long career as a solo act. He was in a number of bands in his younger days, and has played countless side gigs, but it’s as a solo guitar-and-piano act, most memorably at the Allen Street Grill, that Filer has provided the sing-along soundtrack to countless nights on the town.

“I think some people look down their noses at people who do cover songs, but people want to come and have a good time. They don’t need my ego, and I’m OK with that,” Filer says. “I work hard, I’m always on time, and honestly I’m not the greatest musician, but I’m fairly gregarious. I just can’t express how lucky I’ve been.”

You can still catch him on Friday and Saturday nights at the Grill, but for local musicians, Filer’s real home base is his home studio, Audible Images, just outside of State College. That’s where he puts his broad musical knowledge and his electrical engineering degree to work. “I’ve recorded most of the folks in town at one time or another,” he says, “and I don’t think there’s an instrument I haven’t recorded.”

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Daryl Branford ’96

If you’ve seen a great bar band in State College anytime in the past 20 or so years, there’s a good chance you heard Branford laying down the beat. From his undergraduate bands Out of the Blue and Pluv to Sideshow Bob and Original Soul Project to his current gigs with Pure Cane Sugar and Ted McCloskey and the Hi-Fi’s, Branford has been the scene’s go-to drummer for nearly 25 years.

“I’ve always been determined to play music, and to try to earn a living playing music,” Branford says. “However successful things were, I always try to remember that I’m doing it because it’s my passion. There’s a lot of cool things that have happened independent of me—a lot of great musicians, a lot of great bands. I’ve been fortunate to be able to play with some really great people.”

Branford moonlights—or daylights, more accurately—as a design visualization specialist at Penn State’s Huck Institutes of Life Sciences.

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Ted McCloskey ’90

A bandmate of Branford’s in Sideshow Bob, Ted McCloskey is the most prolific songwriter on the scene: His most recent album, 2016’s Last Flower Standing, was his ninth since 2002. He’s also got a new record coming out this year with Countermine, who refers to him as her “musical husband.”

McCloskey’s band the Hi-Fi’s might just boast the most connective tissue on the scene: Both Countermine and Branford are part of the regular lineup, as is bassist Rene Witzke, who is both Countermine’s actual husband and a former member (with Mark Ross) of Queen Bee and the Blue Hornet Band.

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My Hero Zero

The kings of the current party scene, MHZ are paced by Jason Olcese ’06, who recorded an album for his undergraduate thesis in the Schreyer Honors College. Music has long been the focus for Olcese, aka “Jason O,” who says he left rural Northeast PA for State College because “with 40,000 students, there had to be somebody to play music with.”

He found those collaborators with My Hero Zero, whose lineup includes fellow alums Mike Lee ’95, Greg Folsom ’95, and Jordan Thompson ’13. Their trademark sound relies on uptempo covers that get—and keep—the crowd moving.

In addition to regular gigs at the Phyrst, downtown Champs, and the Jersey and Delaware beach scene, MHZ are also longtime favorites at THON. Olcese says that when the band first started playing their set in the packed BJC, “It was the most exciting thing we’d ever done, playing for that many people. But then we started getting to know some of the Four Diamonds families, and it shifted the focus from us to how we can make it all about the kids. The FTK thing really started to sink in.”

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Velveeta

The “Original Un-Originals,” proud purveyors of ’80s cheese, Velveeta seem to have mastered the obvious idea of building their act on rockin’ covers of fun, popular songs. It just so happens that the idea wasn’t all that obvious at the time. After forming as a grunge-inspired band called Broken, the band that would become Velveeta realized that playing originals would only get them so far in Central PA. So they figured they’d give it a go as a cover band—but with a twist.

“We decided to try this experiment to see if we could play these songs that nobody would touch—stuff that was considered very uncool at the time,” says bassist John Matthews ’94. “It was like fishing: You throw a certain type of bait out there and see if they bite.”

The bait was mostly 80s classics like “Come On Eileen” and “Jessie’s Girl,” songs that the band put through a “grunge filter,” as Matthews puts it, but stayed largely faithful to the originals. Within months, he says, most of the band members were able to quit their day jobs. “It exploded,” Matthews says. “It was a unique live music experience in those days. Nobody else was doing it.”

It’s proven to be an approach with staying power, as Velveeta remains a favorite in State College and pretty much anywhere Penn Stater congregate: In December, they traveled to Florida for a wedding of Penn State alums who hired and flew them down for the reception. Matthews and the rest of the band—Brent Martin ’93, Brian Kriley ’93, and John “Bones” Harper—were happy to oblige.

‘We never intended Velveeta to be serious content—hence the name,” he says. “We just wanted it to be fun.”

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Natalie Berrena Race ’06 ’08

She was used to performing in front of a crowd, but for most of her college days, that meant chasing a ball across artificial turf as a member—and eventual co-captain—of the Nittany Lion field hockey team. Natalie Berrena had always loved to sing, but hadn’t worked up the nerve to do it in front of an audience. It wasn’t until her senior year that a friend who knew her secret—and her talent—convinced the booker at The Brewery that she was a manager who repped an up-and-coming singer-songwriter looking for a local gig. “She went behind my back,” she says now. “Then she came to me and said, ‘I have you booked for a gig, and you’re doing it.'”

She did indeed, bringing a keyboard to play and sing through her very first set: “It was something I always wanted to do, I did it, and I loved it. Then I didn’t want to stop.” She hasn’t, playing with Pure Cane Sugar and her own band, Raven and the Wren, where she gets to showcase her original songs.

Like so many local musicians who came here for school—and in her case, a memorable run as a student-athlete—State College has proven a hard place to leave. “I’m so incredibly grateful that I get to do what I love and get paid for it,” she says, “in a community that really supports the arts.”

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Jeff Tomrell ’06

For Go Go Gadjet, the goal has always been getting the crowd moving. That’s just fine with Jeff Tomrell, whose background as a party DJ helps keep him focused on that goal. “When we started in ’05-06, our set was all current pop songs mixed with ’90s throwbacks, and we built our sets so that the music didn’t stop once, one song running into the next,” he says. “We wanted to be as close to a DJ set as we could.”

That commitment to non-stop energy remains even as Tomrell and his band mates have fine-tuned their approach over the years, mixing in some originals with punched-up covers of popular hits, like their recent version of the iconic early 2000s hit “Drops of Jupiter.” And while they play most of their shows these days outside of State College, their hearts are still in Happy Valley—as is (at least) one very memorable gig each year. Earlier this month, they played THON for the 11th time, including their ninth in the coveted closing spot.

“Year after year, we get to see some of these same families, and some of them come out to clubs we play in their area,” Tomrell says. “We’re trying to deliver this experience to these people who have this insanely difficult life, and now that some of us have children of our own… it’s our most important show.”

Ryan Jones, deputy editor

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February 26, 2018 at 6:47 pm 1 comment

Love at Penn State

JF18_LoveLetters_small.pngWe received so many wonderful emails and letters in response to our call for your Penn State love stories, that it was very hard to choose which ones to run in our January/February issue.  So we decided we’d share some more of your stories online. And what better time to do that on Valentine’s Day? Happy Valentine’s Day from the Penn Stater!

Lion Lover

My desk in the Sigma Phi Alpha fraternity house was in a bay window facing a woman’s rooming house. Three coeds raised their window, and motioned for me to raise mine.  They asked what was gaping at them from my desk.  I told them I was the Nittany Lion and kept the head there to keep track of them.  I asked one of the girls if she would meet me at a house party the following Saturday. But just as the girls were coming in, the lights went out. Not knowing which girl I’d invited, I gravitated to the tallest girl silhouetted in the dim light from the street.  It was her and we danced the evening away. We got engaged on December 11, 1944, married on June 23, 1945 while I was in the navy, and enjoyed 67 years of a happy marriage.  Bob Ritzmann ’44, ’46 Sci, State College

 

This Girl, not That One

I didn’t realize, until I picked her up, that the girl who answered the phone when I called for a date was not the one I met at a square dance the week before, but her roommate. Lorraine Hershey had a nice smile, though, and a wonderful warm personality. I took her to a Friday night dance at my fraternity and I remember a warm, good night kiss on soft lips. We soon became inseparable and were married after she graduated in 1965. Bob Ferguson ’64 Agr, Memphis, Tenn.

 

Three Credits and a Wife

Burch and I both signed up for a spring break tourism class that took place over a week in Jamaica.  We fell in love on the beaches and have now been married for 21 years.  Burch likes to say that he really benefited from that tourism class – he got three credits and a wife! Jennifer Wilkes ’94 H&HD, State College

 

Move-in day Meetup-to-Marriage

We met on move-in day. We quickly became friends and ended up going out a few times, but we thought it was best to focus on our studies instead. Years later, unbeknownst to either of us, we both ended up in New York City.  A cousin of mine (who was also a friend of Candace’s from Penn State) reached out to her on Facebook to let her know that we were both now living in the same city and that we should meet up sometime.  After some initial trepidation, we agreed it would be good to catch up. Three years later, we were married. Philippe Rouchon ’05 Sci, Washington, D.C.

 

Bonding over Bagels

During freshman year, I attended Hillel’s “Jewish Speed Dating.” The bagel store was full of guys but one of them, Craig, saw me and it was love at first sight (no joke, ask him). Most people would have said it was “beshert,” the Yiddish word for “meant to be.” Not quite. Craig reached out to me on Facebook, but I forgot to answer. Five months later, we ran into each other on Beaver Avenue during Arts Fest and then at a fraternity party. Eight years later, we got married. It was “beshert” after all. Wendy Cukierman ’12 Edu, Matawan, N.J.

 

In Sickness and in Health
Steve and I met our very first day as freshmen at the Fishbowl Dance in the Pollock Quad.  We became very good friends and hung out all of the time.  We gradually fell in love and a few years later, got married and started a family.  We lost our first two babies:  Kendall was stillborn and Matthew died when he was 16 days old.  We were blessed with our son Daniel in 2001 and in 2005, we adopted our beautiful daughter, Alaina, from Guatemala.  Our love has endured through the best of times as well as the worst. Alisa Kulchinsky Muir ’90 Bus, Florence, S.C.

 

A Near Miss

He suggested we meet to the right of the stadium at the SUV with the orange cone on the roof at the Penn State/Ohio State game on October 29, 1994. We didn’t realize, though, that a lot of tailgaters use orange cones to mark their locations, and we didn’t consider which view of the stadium we were thinking of when we said to meet at “the right.” My best friend and I walked through the different lots and as we approached each orange cone, my heart sank. We didn’t find him. After a consolation dinner with my girlfriend at The Corner Room, I went upstairs to use the ladies room. When I came out, there he was. Fate, good timing and an amazing coincidence brought us together again. That night, we exchanged phone numbers. We haven’t parted since and recently celebrated our 20th anniversary. Erica Fetner Keagy ’95 H&HD, Ardmore, Pa.

 

A Tall Tale

I met the love of my life, René Susan Albrecht, in Waring Dining Hall during Spring Term 1975, and we have one Richard Bartlett to thank for that. René was a 6’ 2” volley baller, and I had a soccer scholarship.  She was in McKee Hall, the graduate dorm, and I was in Irvin Hall, both part of the Waring Quad. Simply put, since I was a reputed “leg man” it was inevitable.  As Rich was a friend in common, and he sometimes shared a table with René, I prevailed upon him for an introduction.  René and I have been sharing bliss now for four decades. Timothy Quentin Unger ’76 Lib, Healdsburg, Calif.

 

Chemical Reaction

My Chem 101 group project in Abington had that inevitable member who didn’t show up for most of our sessions. She had invited one Alen Chao to join our group without telling the rest of us, and we didn’t know he’d actually worked on her portion of the project. When Alen’s name popped up in my packet of peer evaluations, I gave him a negative evaluation: “I have no idea who Alen Chao is and he does not deserve any credit for this project.” Alen saw the evaluations and introduced himself to the group. He and I collaborated, in person, for the next group project and it turned out we had good chemistry. We started dating by the end of the semester and got married in June 2015. Erin Chao’07 Abgt, Stafford, Va.

 

Sweet Spot

I was sure that the guy sitting in front of me knew the answer to the last question on the biochemistry exam paper that I didn’t know. He sat there, relaxed with his chair perched back and arms folded, occasionally adjusting his glasses. Awed by his confidence, I tapped him on the shoulder, which led to a little science talk and a three-year friendship. One humid Fourth of July, while watching the fireworks on the lawn of the Hershey Medical Center, he asked me out on our first date. We’re married now. I’ll never know if I got that question right on my first graduate school exam, but I will always be grateful for it because it led me to my future husband and a lifetime of happiness. Now I know why they call Hershey “The Sweetest Place on Earth.” Christine Sibinski ’15 Hershey, Cockeysville, Md.

 

Lost and Found

At the beginning of my sophomore year, a classmate invited me to a party at his fraternity house. That night, I danced with a guy named Lew. I gave him my number.  He never called, and though I wasn’t surprised, I never forgot him. As seasons and semesters passed, I occasionally steered my friends to that frat, always with a remote and secret hope that he might be there.  And, then, about a year later, he was! Without a moment of thought, I approached him with “I know you.  You’re Lew.  L.E.W.” Surprisingly, he didn’t run away.  And this time, he even called me back.  Turns out, he lost my number the first time around and had been looking for me too. Six years later, we were back at Penn State—this time to get married. Liz Gorman ’07 EMS, Clearwater, Fla.

 

 

 

February 14, 2018 at 10:34 am 1 comment

Inside Our January/February Issue

The turn of the calendar always brings some changes, and the Penn Stater is no exception. When you get our January/February issue, you’ll notice the difference right away, with a smaller page size, new binding, and a new font for our tighter magazine name (notice the missing “The” in “Penn Stater”). You’ll also see a beefed up and, we hope, livelier “Pulse” section, and some big photography spreads. The changes in formatting and content extend throughout the magazine, but we hope that the quality of writing and the selection of articles is everything you’ve come to expect from the Penn Stater magazine. Let us know what you think of the changes at heypennstater@psu.edu.

As far as what you’ll find in the issue, the cover story details the complicated legacy of Harry Anslinger. Although you may have never heard of his name, his imprint on 20th century American culture is hard to mistake. Anslinger 1915 was the first head of the forerunner to today’s Drug Enforcement Administration, the father of the drug war who battled cannabis culture and also took on organized crime. Michael Weinreb ’94 details his story.

Elsewhere in the issue, you’ll find tales of love on campus. We asked for your stories of how it happened for you while you were here and what we got back were tales that were heartwarming, tender, funny, sweet, happy, and sad. And you’ll hear from Steven Levy ’74g, one of the nation’s top tech journalists, who discusses the promises—and perils—of today’s internet world.

You’ll also find out why there’s an air traffic control tower (or not) atop Deike Building, get the original story of the iconic Comic Swap store downtown, and learn what former Nittany Lion basketball star Calvin Booth ’98 is up to in the NBA.

Our Jan./Feb. 2018 issue should be arriving in mailboxes soon. Let us know what you think at heypennstater@psu.edu.

B.J. Reyes, associate editor

December 21, 2017 at 10:15 am Leave a comment

One of “The Fellas” Who Made an Unlikely Mark

The January/February issue of the Penn Stater includes a short obituary of Kevin Cadle ’77, a former Nittany Lion basketball player who went on to unlikely fame in the UK as both a successful coach, and, later, the TV face of American football and basketball in Britain. Cadle, who died in October, left an impressive legacy on both sides of the Atlantic. This video put together by Sky Sports gives a sense of how much he’ll be missed by friends and fans alike.

We learned of Cadle’s passing from Darryl Anderson ’00, his longtime friend and former teammate. Anderson wrote the remembrance below, which we’re happy to share here:

The last time we were in State College together it was a hot summer day in 2016. We just had lunch with the “Fellas,” a group of college friends/former teammates, and “Coach” Don Ferrell, organized by Kevin Cadle. Kevin and I decided to run down to College Avenue and buy some Penn State gear, at the behest of our wives who had decided that we literally wore our Penn State t-shirts, sweat pants etc. until they were threadbare, and it was time to upgrade our wardrobe.

As I started the car, Kevin asked me not to turn on the A/C but to roll down the window, indicating that the weather in London (his adopted city for the last four decades) was so often chilly that he loved the chance for some summer heat, prompting a rather profane comment from me. But it emphasized his Buffalo roots vs his London celebrity lifestyle, and resulted in a big smile and mutual chuckle as we proceeded on our mission. He never forgot where he came from or those that he met along the way. It centered him.

Kevin Cadle was an absolute success in his craft. He graduated from Penn State and got a master’s in education from Texas A&M. He was a broadcaster for Sky Sports, presenter for the NFL in Europe for 16 years, and professional basketball coach for 18 years, with 27 titles and eight coach of the year awards. He was the 1992 UK Olympic qualifying coach. He wrote an autobiography, “The Cadle Will Rock.”

He was a father, son, husband, businessman, mentor, world traveler and friend. A Renaissance man with the savvy of an inner city/urban black kid, blended with the formal education, life exposure and experiences that four years in State College provides. He had the mixture of honesty with a great sense of humor, empathy with passion. Tom Doaty ’77, a backcourt teammate, emphasized Kevin’s honesty and directness: “You may not want to hear what he had to say but you knew he was telling you the truth.”

He understood the struggle of African-Americans and was proud of his heritage. He emphasized what hard work and discipline can do to move us all forward, regardless of our socioeconomic beginnings, our race or ethnicity. He did not accept “half stepping” from anyone—his email signature ended with “Never accept good over best.”

Our teammate Bobby Kinzer ’80 who also played for Kevin in Europe, gave me the news of Kevin’s passing. I did not cry until today writing this (then I wept like a baby) …. I will miss you my brother… the “fellas” know sports and educational opportunity introduced us…. Kevin Cadle kept us together.  “We Are”

Cadle, who lived in suburban London, died unexpectedly on October 15, 2017. He is survived by his wife Lorraine, daughter Toia and mother Loretta.

Ryan Jones, deputy editor

 

December 19, 2017 at 6:41 pm Leave a comment

Award-Winning Writer Susan Miller’s New Play Debuts Off-Broadway

Susan Figlin Miller does not keep a journal. She doesn’t ​jot down or​ record interesting tidbits of conversations she might hear on the subway in New York, or at Webster’s Bookstore Café in downtown State College, where she wrote portions of her new play, 20th Century Blues.

“Once I put words down on a page,” says Miller ’65 Lib, “a story hopefully takes on its own original life.”

Sound easy? Well, perhaps so for a prolific and award-winning author, who has written not just for the stage, but for television (Miller was a writer for the ABC series Thirtysomething), the movies (she wrote the screenplay for a short film called The Grand Design, starring Six Feet Under’s Frances Conroy) and the web (her indie web series Anyone but Me—which airs on Youtube and Hulu—has been viewed over 50 million times).

20th Century Blues, directed by two-time Obie award winner and Tony award-nominee Emily Mann, is Miller’s most recent play, and it begins performances at the Signature Theatre in New York on Nov. 12, running until Jan. 28. The play recounts the story of four women, friends for many years, who meet once a year to have their pictures taken in a ritual that chronicles their changing selves as they navigate life—its rewards and challenges. But when it transpires that those private pictures could go public, their decades-long, tight-knit relationships are suddenly tested, forcing the four women to confront their past and prepare for their future.

“This play is called 20th Century Blues because I don’t think any of us are really living in the 21st century yet,” Miller says. “These women lived most of their lives in the previous century. And the things that happened then, seemed to happen in a way that gave us space and time to absorb the huge impact of what had occurred—World War II, the Army-McCarthy Hearings, the fight for Civil Rights, AIDs. Now, because of the 24-hour news cycle and social media, and the awareness of global tragedy, there is no time to take it all in or heal from it.”

In her body of work, Miller has taken on the big themes—race, gender relations, sexuality, communication— and she’s also focused on what she calls “otherness:” She creates characters that, for one reason or another, fall out of the mainstream (one of the four women in 20th Century Blues is African-American and gay), and she places those characters in situations that are unexpected, situations that force them to think about who they are, how they came to be who they are, how they relate to the people around them. And how the world sees or should see them.

“I feel like our country is still very much in denial of otherness—whether that’s race or culture or just people who are uniquely different,” Miller says. “One of the only ways I think that the fear of otherness can be overcome is to define it and then transform it into something human, because we all participate in this world. It’s something important to me that somehow runs through 20th Century Blues and in my other work.”

Miller wrote her first play, No One is Exactly 23, when she was 23 years old and teaching high school in Carlisle, Pa. She won an Obie award in playwriting, and the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, for her autobiographical, one-woman play My Left Breast.

Miller and cast

Susan Miller and the cast of 20th Century Blues

November 10, 2017 at 10:25 am Leave a comment

Tyler Smith, A True Basketball Globetrotter

Our Nov./Dec. 17 issue includes an item on a new book by former Nittany Lion basketball player Tyler Smith, who spent much of his career overseas chasing a professional basketball contract. As you might guess, the extensive traveling involved in such a venture could lend itself to stories, and Smith ’02 has some pretty good ones. He detailed most of them in emails home to family and friends—having to take toilet paper to away games, playing on odd surfaces, and 30-hour bus trips one way just to get to games. It all lent itself to a pretty good outline for a book.

And so Smith compiled them all into just that: Called for Traveling: My Nomadic Life Playing Pro Basketball Around the World was released in October by Sports Publishing. “People seemed to get a kick out of the stories,” Smith said when we caught up with him by phone recently. “I loved hearing them kind of laugh through their emails.”

Smith’s LinkedIn profile tells the story. On it is a line: “Pro Basketball Player, 2002­–2013.” Under locations it lists Holland, Italy, Uruguay, Argentina, Utah Jazz, NBA D-League, Japan, and Thailand. “It’s such an unorthodox lifestyle—you’re in these foreign countries, you don’t speak the language, sometimes teams don’t pay you, you’re away from everybody and everything you know,” Smith said. “People wouldn’t believe some of the stuff that happens. They think, ‘Ohh, it’s traveling the world, and living this amazing life.’ Sometimes we have some pretty cool experiences and sometimes you’re bringing your own toilet paper to away games.”

He counts playing in Holland and Italy among the better experiences he had. Then there was Argentina: “I took a 30-hour bus ride, one-way, to play a game. They brought two bus drivers because we’d just drive as long as we could until one of them had to pull over and have a smoke.”

“I played in Uruguay three times, and the first time I went down there was the most shocking because there’s 16 teams in the league, and only four of them had wooden-floor courts,” he said. “It was like some kind of concrete or a tile or I don’t even know what you call it—you’re sliding all over the place. One time we were playing a game and my point guard wasn’t running back on defense and our coach is yelling at him and he says he can’t, his shoe is stuck in the floor. There, literally, was a hole in the floor and his shoe got caught in it.”

Still, Smith considers himself lucky to have had the experiences over an 11-year playing career. But the nomadic lifestyle is still in him: Smith has spent the past four years working as a medical device sales representative, still travelling across states to consult on medical equipment and prosthetic implants.

As for the book, “You don’t have to be a hardcore basketball junkie to like this book,” he says. “There’s a little bit of everything in there. I talk about family and bringing my kids with me—that adds a whole new element of challenge to the journey—and talking about my faith. I don’t know if anybody other than the three ladies in my mom’s book club are gonna read it, but if nothing else it’ll be down on paper and I can show it to my daughters.”

B.J. Reyes, associate editor

 

 

 

 

November 7, 2017 at 10:58 am 2 comments

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