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Shakespeare’s ‘Twelfth Night,’ Updated

dsc_0814-maria-viola-fabiana-medWhen I heard that Penn State Centre Stage would be presenting the Shakespeare classic Twelfth Night this season, I pictured a production and costumes that would be—well, Shakespearean.

But it turns out that director Steve Snyder wanted to offer a more contemporary take on the tale. He set it in 1953, and studded it with a few musical numbers from the 1940s and 1950s—songs like “As Time Goes By,” “Unforgettable,” “Beyond the Sea,” and “C’est Si Bon.”

After all, Snyder says, the themes of the 17th century play are still relevant: “We still fall in love with the wrong people,” he writes in the show’s notes. “We still try to disengage from life, or alter how we engage with life, when it gets hard. We still desire to rise or somehow get more. We still have that one relative who is insufferable, but is still family. We still deal with bullies, then sometimes become the bully ourselves. We still have to learn and re-learn the need for forgiveness, kindness and mercy.”

Snyder is an Equity actor and faculty member in Penn State’s School of Theatre, and virtually everyone else involved in the play—from the cast members to the set designer to the costume designer—is either an undergrad or grad student in the school. It’s an impressive ensemble.

Twelfth Night had a preview performance on Monday and and will have another tonight, with the official opening tomorrow night. The show goes dark next week, but resumes Nov. 29. It closes Dec. 3. More information here.

Below are a few photos I took at a dress rehearsal last weekend. Click on them if you’d like to scroll through them individually.

Tina Hay, editor

November 16, 2016 at 3:55 pm Leave a comment

Just a Few Things Going on This Weekend…

StraightNoChaser

Straight No Chaser. Photo by Tina Hay

Anyone looking for something to do at University Park this weekend has plenty of choices. Between sports and music, you could pretty much spend your whole weekend on campus.

Last night a friend and I took in the Straight No Chaser concert (photo above) in Eisenhower Auditorium. The 10-member group does entirely a cappella versions of pop hits and Christmas tunes, including a hilarious version of “The 12 Days of Christmas” that you can find on YouTube. The ensemble got its start 20 years ago as a student singing group at Indiana University, which made for some good-natured banter on the eve of today’s Penn State football game with the Hoosiers: Group members tried to make the case that it was about time for Indiana to beat Penn State, and audience members responded with a spontaneous “We Are…” cheer.

Eisenhower will host another concert tonight: the Penn State Glee Club’s annual fall concert. Meanwhile, over at the Bryce Jordan Center, there’s a concert tonight by Brand New.

And then there’s all of the sports on campus this weekend:

—The men’s ice hockey team beat Alaska-Anchorage 7-3 last night in the Pegula Arena. And, because it doesn’t make much sense for a team to travel all the way from Alaska to play just one game, the two teams will square off again tonight at 7.

—The women’s ice hockey team skated to a 1-1 tie with Lindenwood this afternoon at Pegula.

—The women’s field hockey team, fresh off winning the Big Ten championship, was upset in the first round of the NCAA tournament today, losing to Princeton, 2-1. A tough end to the season, but an impressive 17-3 record.

—The women’s soccer team—defending NCAA champs—beat Bucknell 6-0 last night at Jeffrey Field in the first round of the NCAAs.

—The men’s basketball team lost to Albany, 87-81, last night in the Jordan Center. The Lions return to the BJC Sunday evening at 6 to host Duquesne.

—The women’s basketball team hosts St. Peter’s in the BJC tomorrow afternoon at 1.

—The wrestling team has its first home meet of the season tomorrow, hosting Stanford at 2 pm in sold-out Rec Hall. The Lions are coming off a 45-0 shutout of Army last night at West Point.

Other than that, it’s pretty quiet around here this weekend.

Tina Hay, editor

 

 

 

November 12, 2016 at 7:01 pm Leave a comment

Headshots—of Birds

dsc_0710_female_cardinal

I’ve long been a fan of the bird-banding program offered by the Arboretum at Penn State. (I’ve written about it here, here, and here.) Under the direction of volunteer Nick Kerlin ’71, who has both a state and federal license to do this sort of thing, students put up “mist nets” to catch wild birds, then fit each bird with a tiny metal ID band. They record data on the bird’s weight, age, sex, etc., and then set it free.

Nick sends the data to the U.S. Geological Survey’s Bird Banding Laboratory in Patuxent, Md., where scientists can use the information to monitor the health and migration patterns of bird populations.

I like the research aspect of bird-banding, of course, but I also like how it offers Penn State wildlife science students—and anyone else who’s interested in stopping by—a chance to learn about birds in a very up-close way. It’s also a great chance to photograph the birds. This morning I took a macro lens along, to try some close-up portraits, and I thought I’d share a few of the images I got. Above is a female cardinal, and below is a more extreme close-up of the same image:

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The group this morning also banded several white-throated sparrows, a handsome bird that, around here, shows up in the fall and stays until spring. Here’s one:

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And here’s a tufted titmouse. Note the leg band he’s just acquired:

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There are two more banding sessions remaining in the fall season; you can see more information about them here.

Tina Hay, editor

October 19, 2016 at 1:12 pm Leave a comment

What I Learned About Earthquakes on My Lunch Hour

ElizaRichardson

Eliza Richardson

Today I went to a lunchtime lecture at Schlow Library downtown, to hear Penn State geoscientist Eliza Richardson talk about earthquakes. No special reason, really, except that we just finished the November/December issue of the magazine, so suddenly I have a little more time for such things. Lectures like these are a good way for us to scout possible stories for the magazine. And, besides, I know pretty much nothing about earthquakes.

In an hour’s time, I learned a lot. Here’s a sampling:

—Scientists would love to be able to predict earthquakes: when they’ll strike, where they’ll strike, and how big they’ll be. Richardson calls it the “holy grail” in her field.

—”The biggest earthquakes aren’t always the worst,” Richardson says. She showed three lists—the 10 biggest earthquakes in history, the 10 deadliest, and the 10 costliest—and pointed out that only two earthquakes appear on all three lists. (Those were the 2004 quake and tsunami near Sumatra and the 2011 quake and tsunami off the Japanese coast.)

—The so-called “World Series Earthquake” of 1989 in San Francisco was not quite as strong as the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti—the San Francisco quake was a magnitude 7.0, vs. 7.2 in Haiti—yet only 68 people died in San Francisco, vs. 159,000 in Haiti. “That’s all about infrastructure,” Richardson says: San Francisco has many buildings that are seismically retrofitted, while Haiti, an impoverished country, does not.

—Earthquakes happen along fault lines where two tectonic plates bump into each other, and “stress overcomes friction” along that fault line. “If the plate boundaries could all be lubricated with the scientific equivalent of WD-40, earthquakes would never happen,” Richardson says.

—Earthquakes happen far more often than people realize. Her title slide included a USGS-generated world map very similar to this one…

USGS world earthquake map

…which shows all earthquakes of magnitude 2.5 or greater just in the past 30 days.

You can click on the map to see it bigger. Obviously the fault lines along the West Coast of the Americas are pretty impressive, along with poor Italy, which is practically obliterated by all the dots.

—Speaking of Italy: Scientists often are hesitant (“cagey,” Richardson called it) about saying they’re working on earthquake prediction. She cited the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake in Italy as one reason: The city had been experiencing tremors for months, so a special meeting of seismologists was convened, and many people interpreted the scientists’ comments at that meeting as suggesting there was nothing to fear. A week later, a magnitude-6.3 quake hit the city, and more than 300 people died. Five scientists ended up standing trial for manslaughter—and were convicted. A higher court eventually overturned the convictions, but the events surely had a chilling effect on seismologists worldwide.

(You can read an interesting account of the L’Aquila quake and subsequent criminal trial at Smithsonianmag.com.)

—While seismologists can’t yet predict earthquakes, there’s been a lot of progress in the field in the past 10 years. Scientists are starting to pay more attention to silent earthquakes called “slow slip earthquakes,” which can be measured by GPS devices. These slow slips may turn out to be harbingers of a larger, far more damaging quake.

—There’s a fairly prominent fault line in the U.S. midwest, called the New Madrid (pronounced MAD rid) Fault, which in 1811 and 1812 spawned the largest earthquakes in U.S. history. If they happened today, says Richardson, they would level Memphis and several other cities. They reportedly shook the White House, hundreds of miles away, and caused church bells to ring in Boston.

(You can read more about the New Madrid earthquakes here.)

OK, there’s lots more, but I’ve probably babbled enough. Suffice it to say I think Richardson’s research is really interesting and would make for a great story in the magazine sometime.

The lecture was sponsored by Schlow Library as part of its Research Unplugged series; the fall schedule continues through Nov. 10.

Tina Hay, editor

October 13, 2016 at 4:10 pm Leave a comment

We Are … in Peru???

Shortly after we shipped the Sept./Oct. issue off to the printer, I took off for a two-week vacation, in the form of a photography workshop in Peru. Most of the time on the trip was spent in the Amazonian rainforest—the Tambopata National Reserve, where we photographed macaws, toucans, frogs, and other critters. But for the last three days, we were based in Cusco, and on one of those three days we made the trip to Machu Picchu.

We went to the famed Incan site the easy way: We took a train from Cusco to the town of Aguascalientes, then rode a bus up the mountain to the site. There was definitely a bit of uphill walking after the bus dropped us off, and the altitude (about 8,000 feet) had me huffing and puffing. But it was nothing compared to the trek the die-hards make on the Inca Trail, a roughly four-day, 26-mile hike with elevations of more than 13,000 feet in some places. We saw a lot of the trekkers in Aguascalientes, and some of them were in our train car back to Cusco.

On that ride back, one of the other photographers on the trip asked me if I had seen the guy with the Penn State sweatpants on. I had not! So I immediately took a walk up the train car, found the guy, and asked him the obvious yet dumb question: “Did you go to Penn State?” The answer: He had, and so had his travel partner in the seat next to him.

So, meet Michael Stegura ’13 Eng (left) Paul Ferrera ’13 Bus: 

Stegura and Ferrara

(You can’t see it here, but Ferrera was the one in the Penn State sweatpants.)

The pair, who have known each other since they were kids in the Lehigh Valley, were on their way back to Cusco after completing the four-day hike to Machu Picchu. I asked them how they were feeling, and they said, “Tired.” But to me, they looked great for a couple of guys who had just finished one of the top treks in the world.

Tina Hay, editor

September 1, 2016 at 2:53 pm 1 comment

At the National Aviary, Birds—and Penn Staters—Abound

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Jenny Walsh ’06 and a laughing kookaburra.

I’ve long been fascinated by birds—from the cardinals and chickadees that frequent my backyard feeders to the toucans and hummingbirds I’ve seen on trips to Costa Rica. On a visit to Orlando, Fla., some years back to speak at a magazine conference, I skipped Disney World and instead spent my free time at Discovery Cove, because it has a very cool aviary.

But I hadn’t been to the National Aviary in Pittsburgh in many years. And when I found out that a Penn Stater, Cheryl Columbus Tracy ’86, is executive director of the aviary, I decided it was time for a road trip.

A few weeks ago I drove to Pittsburgh and got a tour of the place from Cheryl. Wow, has she made an impact there—she’s overseen a major expansion in the past seven years, adding new exhibits, new space for the penguin colony, a FliteZone and a Sky Deck for special shows with live birds, and other features.

In the new Grasslands exhibit, I got to see birds I never knew existed: owl finches, Gouldian finches, paradise whydahs, and red bishops, to name a few. Elsewhere I saw one of the aviary’s four Andean condors, part of a breeding program to help restore populations of the endangered bird. I met a beautiful hyacinth macaw named Benito and a couple of strange-looking birds called rhinoceros hornbills.

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Valentino, the aviary’s enormously popular—and mellow—baby sloth.

A highlight was the chance to see one of the aviary’s newest and most beloved residents: Valentino, the baby two-toed sloth. Valentino came to the aviary last winter to serve as an ambassador for sloths, birds, and other creatures whose rainforest habitat is shrinking—and, oh man, is he cute. (Click on the photo at left to see a bigger version and gaze into his dreamy eyes.)

I also got to hang out for a while with some of the Penn Staters at the aviary:

Mike Faix ’05, an education trainer, who teaches the birds to perform in the aviary’s shows.

Tammy Carradine Frech ’85, who’s in charge of volunteers and interns.

Teri Danehy Grendzinski ’93, supervisor of animal collections. She’s been at the aviary for 23 years, pretty much ever since she graduated.

Michael Leonard ’04, who does IT for a local law firm and volunteers at the aviary.

Jessie Baird Lehosky ’06, events manager. She handles weddings and other events that take place at the aviary.

Jenny Walsh ’06, assistant manager of behavioral management and education.

I shot the short video clip below with Tammy Frech, who’s holding a scarlet macaw named Red. As you’ll see, Red can speak on command—when he’s not busy eating a treat.

You can read more about my aviary visit in the September/October issue of the magazine, and you can see a handful of additional photos from the aviary visit on my Flickr page.

Tina Hay, editor

 

August 30, 2016 at 9:07 am Leave a comment

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