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For STEM Companies, Career Fair Offers an Abundance of Potential New Recruits

Photo via Savita Iyer

It was impossible to miss Raychel Frisenda and her friend Brianna Bennett in the melee of formally dressed students thronging the Bryce Jordan Center on Thursday, the third day of Penn State’s annual Fall Career Fair.

Not only had the engineering juniors eschewed the de rigeur suit, their pink (Rachyel) and blue (Brianna) hair set them apart from the crowd.

“Sure, it’s a little intimidating to show up dressed like this and see 4,000 people in suits,” Raychel said with a laugh, “but suits are so not me.”

“I don’t do ties and suits,” Brianna added, “and that’s not going to change, probably not even when I go to work.”

By all accounts, though, attire and hair color are irrelevant to the many companies gathered at the BJC on Thursday, technical recruiting day: Recruiters for these firms said they have positions to fill and they know they can count on Penn State to offer up smart, highly qualified STEM candidates like Reagen Alexich ’16, a chemical engineering major who found her current job at CoverGirl cosmetics at the Career Fair.

Coty, CoverGirl’s parent company, really needs more process engineers, Reagen said, and Penn State students are highly coveted.

It’s no secret that STEM jobs are among the hardest to fill. Companies reportedly have a tough time finding qualified candidates, and now, many are focused on creating a diverse workforce by hiring more women and minorities.

“Engineering is a very male dominated field,” Reagen said, “and in my graduating class, there were definitely more guys than girls.”

Today, diversity is a business imperative for any STEM company, according to Wayne Gersie, associate director of Penn State’s multicultural engineering program, and those companies that don’t have a diverse workforce stand to lose against their competitors in a globalized world.

Photo via Savita Iyer

It is not easy, though, for colleges to attract and retain STEM students from minority backgrounds. These are tough subjects, Gersie said, and they’re costly undertakings for many students, “but our office is dedicated to ensuring students not only succeed academically, but that from the moment they set foot on campus, they start developing a career trajectory that makes them highly attractive targets by the time they get to the Career Fair.”

Penn State is also making a dedicated effort to promote and retain women engineering students, Gersie said, thanks to the efforts of Cheryl Knoblauch, associate director of the Women in Engineering Program, and that’s making a difference out in the professional world.

“Even in the short time I’ve been working, I’ve seen that recruitment has become much more diverse, with more women joining male-dominated industries like the steel industry,” said Kailee Waugaman ’16, who also found her job with steel giant AreclorMittal at the fair, and is now recruiting for the firm.

Overall, opportunities abound for engineers, scientists, mathematicians and the like. And companies are not only looking for techies: A fair number of the 530-plus firms present during the three-day Career Fair came to scout out non-technical prospects as well.

This year’s recruiting companies represented a range of sectors and included Amazon, American Eagle Outfitters, Boeing, Corning, Dell, Nestle, Siemens and many more. The Pennsylvania State Police, the United States Postal Service, the City of Pittsburgh, and other entities were also present.

Savita Iyer, senior editor

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September 20, 2017 at 9:24 am Leave a comment

Got a Few Minutes? Print Out a Short Story

There are three buttons on the brand new Short Story Dispenser at Schlow Library. I press the middle one and wait for it to generate a free story that will apparently take me three minutes to read (the other options are for a minute and five-minute reads).

Within seconds, a story titled “In the Dark” prints out on what looks like a lengthy grocery store receipt. It just happened to be at the top of the three-minute queue at that moment, and that randomness is what makes Short Story Dispensers so cool, says Joseph Salem, associate dean for learning in the university libraries: You just don’t know what you’re going to get when you press whatever button you press.

The dispensers are the brainchild of Grenoble, France-based Short Edition, whose founder reportedly got the idea while standing in front of a traditional vending machine.

Penn State and Schlow Library in State College are the first educational and public libraries, respectively, to offer the dispensers, says Salem, who worked closely on the project with Jill Shockey ’95, marketing and public relations manager for the University Libraries. They’ve been in talks with Short Edition since last fall and arranged for five dispensers to be set up on the University Park campus on May 8. These generate content, which has been translated into English, from the main Short Edition story bank in France.

Now, the libraries are working with Short Edition to create an independent Penn State story bank, to which any student and faculty member will be able to contribute. The stories will be uploaded onto a special website and will, eventually, be readable on mobile devices as well.

“We’re hoping to have stories that are locally relevant and we want to encourage everyone to submit stories,” Salem says. “The exciting part is that our content, once we’ve worked around copyright issues, will also feed into the main Short Edition story bank.”

He believes that the super-short format of the stories appeals to both readers and writers.

“It can be daunting to write a full story that’s so short, but it’s also doable,” he says. “And a lot of people these days don’t have time for concentrated reading over lunch time—we don’t have time to really engage with a novel, and it’s definitely easier to read a short story, engage with it and ponder it over lunch.”

More than 1,200 stories have been printed on campus and at Schlow since the dispensers were first set up, Salem says, and library staff report that people are actively sharing their printouts.

Savita Iyer, senior editor

May 25, 2017 at 11:21 am 1 comment

Alumna’s Coasters for Sexual Assault Awareness Month Underscore Consent is Non-Negotiable

Photo via Kristine Irwin

Throughout the month of April, seven Pittsburgh restaurants have been serving drinks on a special set of coasters designed and donated by Kristine Irwin ’09, a rape survivor and founder of the nonprofit Voices of Hope. The coasters are colorful—they’re fun and playful, even. But on the back, each one carries the dictionary definition of consent, and Irwin hopes the Consent Coaster Campaign will help spread the critical message that consent is a non-negotiable.

Irwin was 19 when she raped by a man she’d worked for the summer before she began college. She had had a few drinks with him, but recalled nothing else when she woke up in a hospital bed the next morning. Still, she considers herself lucky, because on that morning in 2004 when she was thrown out of a car onto an unknown street with no idea of how she got there or that she had been raped, a woman happened to be looking out of her window and called 911.
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April 27, 2017 at 12:52 pm Leave a comment

Talking Asia with the AP’s Ted Anthony

Ted Anthony ’95 grew up immersed in Thailand.

Before he was born, his parents—linguistics professors at the University of Pittsburgh—had lived and worked there. Their home was filled with Thai artifacts, so for Anthony, moving to Bangkok in 2014 as the Associated Press’s Asia-Pacific news director felt like “coming full circle”—all the more so because his parents had gone there with his recently widowed grandmother, and he with his wife and two children.

But Anthony—who was at University Park this week to receive an outstanding alumni award from the Department of History—landed in Bangkok at a tumultuous time. A mere three days after he took up his position, he told students in a history class on Tuesday, the Thai army staged a military coup against the government, suspending the constitution and imposing martial law. Naturally, the events left Anthony no time to indulge in the nostalgia of his family’s connection to Thailand.

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April 19, 2017 at 10:26 am Leave a comment

Diane Ackerman Discusses ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’

Diane Ackerman, award-winning poet, essayist, and author, draws on the many wonders of the natural world to inspire her work. The movie version of her book, The Zookeeper’s Wife, starring Golden Globe-winning actress Jessica Chastain, hits theaters today (you can watch the trailer at the top of this post).

The book recounts the story of Jan Zabinski, director of the Warsaw zoo in 1939, and his wife Antonina, who during the Nazi occupation of Poland, tirelessly worked with the Polish resistance to hide hundreds of Jewish people, and zoo animals, in their villa. The Zabinskis helped many Jews escape to safety and saved numerous animals.

We chatted with Ackerman ’70 via email. Here’s what she has to say about The Zookeeper’s Wife, about her work and about the power of nature:

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March 31, 2017 at 10:06 am Leave a comment

A Journalist’s View of Iran

Laura SecorIt is extremely difficult for western journalists, American journalists in particular, to enter The Islamic Republic of Iran. But Laura Secor, journalist and author of Children of Paradise: The Struggle for the Soul of Iran (Riverhead Books, 2016), was fortunate enough to be able to visit the country on several occasions between 2005 and 2012, and to gain unique insight into the hearts and minds of Iranians struggling against a harsh and repressive regime in their quest for a national and cultural identity.

Secor—daughter of retired Penn State English professors Bob and Marie Secor—spoke at a Penn State Forum luncheon on Friday. She’s written widely on Iran for The New Yorker, The New York Times, and Foreign Affairs, among others. Her book encapsulates the shifting political and intellectual tumult in Iran, and the ebbs and flows of dissent that have ensued since the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

She was drawn to Iran, she says, “because as a journalist I loved the idea of going into something forbidden. And when I was growing up, Iran was so off-limits, it was so demonized.”

The time Secor spent in Iran brought her close to a wide array of dissenters: Philosophers. Bloggers. Student activists. Feminists. Intrepid journalists. She also got to know key Iranian dissenters living in exile in other countries and got their stories.

“I was blown away by the level of civic engagement and civic courage I encountered in Iran,” she told me after the luncheon. “By my second visit, I was completely engulfed by people I got close to, by their stories, and I admired the bravery, grace, and dignity with which they operated.”

Needless to say, the Iranian government kept strict tabs on Secor’s comings and goings (the people she interviewed were closely followed, too), and in 2012, she was detained and questioned by the authorities, asked to prove that she was indeed a journalist and not a spy.

She was released—but since then, Secor has been denied a visa to Iran and has not been able to return to the country.

Which saddens her greatly, she says, even as she plans to move onto covering other parts of the world.

Savita Iyer, senior editor

March 27, 2017 at 9:00 am Leave a comment

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