Inside our March/April issue

March 2, 2020 at 3:03 pm Leave a comment

Who knew a magnified image of T cells attacking a cancer cell could double as art? (Image by Madhuri Dey)

When materials science researchers dive deep into the substances they study, the resulting images are often surprisingly artistic, especially when colored to display the researchers’ creative sides. The annual Materials Visualization Competition encourages these researchers to be creative with some of their findings, with the elemental particles of the materials resembling everything from a child’s toy xylophone to scoops of ice cream. The cover story of our March/April issue features some of the most compelling images from the competition in a photo feature beginning on p. 28.

We also take a look at science from another angle: In an era of dizzying, sometimes unchecked, scientific progress, how much is too much? Renowned biochemist Paul Berg, Penn State’s sole Nobel Prize winner and a giant in his field, might ultimately be remembered for sounding the alarm and urging restraint on such progress. Our profile of Berg begins on p. 38. And a new book by Penn State historian A.K. Sandoval-Strausz showcases how Latinx immigrants helped prop up America’s cities during the postwar period, and how that influence continues today. A Q&A with Sandoval-Strausz begins on p. 44.

Plus: Learn how the “Living Filter” at University Park converts wastewater to groundwater for irrigating fields and farmland (p. 36); get up-to-date on research behind a potential new fast-charging battery for electric cars (p. 19); and meet the unlikely running duo of Tom Sciabica and Gregory Fleck (p. 24).

—B.J Reyes, associate editor

Entry filed under: The Penn Stater Magazine.

Inside our November/December issue Inside our May/June issue

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Follow The Penn Stater on Twitter

Enter your email address to follow us and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 499 other followers


%d bloggers like this: