NCAA Sanctions Repealed, Paterno’s Wins Restored

January 16, 2015 at 4:10 pm 3 comments

IMG_3693_trustees_resolutionKeith Masser ’73 stuck to the script when he opened the Penn State Board of Trustees meeting today, saying he had some good news to report: that Penn State’s World Campus scored a No. 1 ranking in the U.S. News rankings of online programs.

But a few moments later, President Eric Barron took the podium and announced the day’s truly big news: that Penn State, the NCAA, and state officials had reached a tentative agreement to roll back the sanctions against Penn State in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal. And not long after that, the trustees voted unanimously to approve the agreement.

The NCAA issued a news release spelling out the terms of the agreement, the major points being that (1) 112 vacated wins—111 belonging to Joe Paterno, and one to Tom Bradley ’78—are restored (or, to quote a tweet by Charles Thompson of the Harrisburg Patriot-News, “And move over Bobby Bowden!”), and (2) the $60 million in fine money stays in Pennsylvania.

But State Sen. Jake Corman ’93, in a Harrisburg news conference, was more blunt: “The consent decree is hereby repealed,” he said, and “all remaining sanctions against Penn State are voided.” You can read a news release from Corman’s office here.

The trustees’ vote on the settlement was quick, with no discussion or debate before the roll-call vote, and the vote was unanimous.

Trustee Anthony Lubrano, who invited reporters to an impromptu news conference in the hallway outside the meeting—while the meeting was still in progress, with President Barron giving a report—said that the agreement isn’t perfect, but is still a win overall.

A point of contention with some in the Penn State community had been the possibility that, in order to see a rollback of the sanctions, the university would have to acknowledge that the NCAA had the right to impose the sanctions in the first place. The wording of the agreement appears to be very carefully phrased in that regard; it says that “Penn State acknowledges the NCAA’s legitimate and good faith interest and concern regarding the Jerry Sandusky matter.”

The restoration of Paterno’s wins has already prompted calls to return the Paterno statue to its spot outside Beaver Stadium. Corman, asked about it at his news conference, said it’s a decision for Penn State to make, but added, “In my personal opinion,” it should be put back. Lubrano also called for the university to return the Paterno statue, suggesting Homecoming might be a good target date.

The Paterno family issued a statement calling today “a great victory for everyone who has fought for the truth in the Sandusky tragedy.” The advocacy group Penn Staters for Responsible Stewardship was less pleased, thanking Sen. Corman and state Treasurer Rob McCord but adding, “Unfortunately, we cannot support an agreement that does not require the NCAA to acknowledge its wrongdoing.”

Penn State has posted a news release about today’s settlement announcement, with comments from President Barron and Chair Masser. Barron, Masser, and attorney Frank Guadagnino ’78 will speak with the media after today’s meeting.

Tina Hay, editor

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Entry filed under: Board of Trustees. Tags: , , , .

Brace Yourself for Meya Bizer President Barron’s Comments on the NCAA Settlement

3 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Kevin_Landon  |  January 16, 2015 at 5:26 pm

    It’s about bloody time! Now return the stolen statue!!!

  • 2. Anonymous  |  January 16, 2015 at 6:29 pm

    Great, but Mr. Lubrano’s behavior was apalling! I guess it’s all about him…..

  • 3. Anonymous  |  January 16, 2015 at 8:43 pm

    Finally! And now we need the BigTen to do the right thing and give PSU the bowl money we earned from this year’s game and our share of the BigTen bowl money from 2011-2013 and then we need to hear that Emmert was fired for his ridiculous actions against the university and the players who had nothing to do with the Sandusky scandal.

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