Posts tagged ‘Tim Curley’

The Penn Stater Daily — March 5, 2014

James Franklin, Coming Soon to a Town Near You: The Coaches Caravan returns in May, headlined by James Franklin, who will visit 17 area locales—13 in Pennsylvania, plus forays into Baltimore, Washington, D.C., New Jersey, and New York City. Among the in-state stops on the tour, which is jointly sponsored by the Alumni Association and the Nittany Lion Club: four Penn State campuses and one event at Franklin’s alma mater, East Stroudsburg. More details on tickets will be coming later this month, but you can click here for the dates and clear your schedule now.

Running strong: Fresh off winning the Big Ten indoor track championship over the weekend, sophomore Kiah Seymour has been named the conference’s Track Athlete of the Championships, and coach Beth Alford-Sullivan earned the conference’s Coach of the Year award for the indoor season. Seymour won the 400 meters and anchored the winning 4×400-meter relay, and she finished second in the 200 meters. Get the full scoop here.

ICYMI on Mike McQueary: ESPN The Magazine on Tuesday published “The Whistleblower’s Last Stand,” a story about Mike McQueary ’97, who will be a central figure in the upcoming trial of Graham Spanier, Gary Schultz ’71, ’75g, and Tim Curley ’76, ’78g. If you’ve not yet read it, it’s certainly worth the time.

RIP, EP: Ellen Perry, another of the women who spearheaded the development of Penn State women’s athletics, died Tuesday. She spent 36 years at Penn State, arriving in 1966 as the first coach of the women’s swimming team and retiring in 2002 as associate athletic director and senior woman administrator. Known by everyone as “EP,” Perry was one of those people who had boatloads of knowledge and expertise, but imparted it with a light touch. This Centre Daily Times story quotes Perry from a story about her retirement, and I particularly loved how she basically summed up her life philosophy: “Believe in the goal you’re trying to make and complete and go at it with a well-intended heart. A happy heart works much better than an angry heart.”

Lori Shontz, senior editor

March 5, 2014 at 3:39 pm Leave a comment

The Penn Stater Daily — Dec. 18, 2013

Legal update: Here’s the short story: Tuesday’s pretrial  hearing produced no clarity on whether Cynthia Baldwin ’66, ’74g, Penn State’s former general counsel, will be able to testify in the trial of Graham Spanier, Tim Curley ’76, ’78g, and Gary Schultz ’71, ’75g. The judge said that rather than hear testimony from Baldwin, he will make his ruling based on the documents. You can see links to some of those documents here in a Patriot-News story. The basic issue is whether Baldwin violated attorney-client privilege when she testified to the grand jury and, therefore, whether her testimony is admissible in court. But the question is complicated. This Centre Daily Times story, based on additional documents, explains that Penn State waived attorney-client privilege, allowing Baldwin to testify. If you’ve got the time and have been following this case closely, the documents are really worth your time to check out.

Behind the scenes of Lunar Lion: If you read our November/December cover story or any of the other coverage, you know a little about Lunar Lion, its goal to land a spacecraft on the moon by 2015, and the giant university effort involved in the project. Those stories went big. Here’s one that goes small and shows what Lunar Lion is doing on a micro scale. Bobby Chen of Onward State tells the story of Philip Chow, a sophomore who is leading the procurement of parts for the effort. Yeah, a sophomore. Buying parts for a mission to the moon. In between classes. That’s likely unprecedented, and it’s a great story. Full disclosure: Bobby originally wrote this for my news writing class.

O’Brien watch: If you’re still obsessing over Bill O’Brien’s potential NFL opportunities, Dave Jones of the Patriot-News breaks down his options here.

Relax, says Mike the Mailman: According to Mike the Mailman—and, really, who do you trust more?—you’ve got until Saturday, Dec. 21, to get packages mailed in time to get there by Christmas. At least, that’s the case at Mike’s post office. Christian Heilman has the video story for Penn State’s Centre County Report. If you want faster service, Christian says, there’s a solution—bring cookies. Again, at least at Mike’s post office.

Lori Shontz, senior editor

December 18, 2013 at 1:19 pm 1 comment

The Penn Stater Daily — Dec. 16, 2013

Your Monday sports wrap: The Nittany Lions’ “Return to Rec” game was a huge success in all but the final score, an 81-79 overtime loss Saturday to Princeton. The Tigers clawed back from a 20-point second-half deficit to dampen Penn State’s first game at Rec Hall since 1996. Still, it was a great afternoon for the fans who packed into the old barn—if you weren’t there, you can find a terrific bunch of photos from Mark Selders here. The women’s volleyball team enjoyed a more successful weekend on the road, beating Michigan State and long-time rival Stanford to guarantee a return to the NCAA Final Four. Penn State will face Washington on Thursday in Seattle for a chance to play in the national title game.

I thought the contrast in photos Onward State ran in back-to-back stories on the hoops and volleyball games was worth noting:

MBB WVB

Also in action this weekend: The Lady Lions got back on track after a tough week with a 66-58 win over No. 20 Texas A&M, and the No. 2 wrestling team dominated No. 6 Ohio State, 31-6.

Making their case: At a pretrial hearing Tuesday in Harrisburg, attorneys for Graham Spanier, Tim Curley ’76, ’78g, and Gary Schultz ’71, ’75g will argue that the cases against them should be thrown out. At issue is the role of Cynthia Baldwin ’66, ’74g, the former university counsel, and the question of whether Baldwin was representing them or the university in front of a grand jury in 2010. You can read more here.

“Ready” or not? We knew the rumors were coming, and with Penn State’s football season over, we didn’t have to wait long. CBS Sports writer Jason La Canfora reported Sunday that, “according to pro and college sources,” Bill O’Brien is “ready” to return to the NFL. Is it true? Probably only O’Brien, his family, and his agent know for sure, but you can expect to hear much more on this over the coming weeks as NFL teams wrap up the regular season and prepare for the annual turnover in head coaching jobs. Stay tuned.

It’s finals week: The cold front that has smacked Happy Valley in recent days should make it easier for students to cuddle up with warm books and laptops for the next few days as they wrap up the fall semester with final exams. Student media has all sorts of finals-related coverage—much of it lighthearted, much of it NSFW, exactly—but this list of songs to get students through study sessions from the Daily Collegian’s “Finals Mag” is somewhat illuminating. Who knew they were listening to Dylan?

Ryan Jones, senior editor

December 16, 2013 at 12:40 pm 1 comment

The Penn Stater Daily — Dec. 2, 2013

Underdogs? 24-point underdogs? I’ll admit it: I was one of the doubters. I was the lector at Saturday night Mass, and I never dreamed that when I came out of church, the Nittany Lions would be on the verge of defeating No. 15 Wisconsin. I missed the entire second half, so I had a lot of catching up to do when I got home. Here’s what I did: watched this video from the locker room, this video of Bill O’Brien’s news conference, read this piece by Dave Jones of The Patriot-News about freshman quarterback Christian Hackenberg, who completed 21 of 30 passes for 339 yards and four touchdowns and is racking up all kinds of recognition, and checked out John McGonigal’s game story in the Collegian.

Looking to the future: Can’t wait for next football season? Get ready now by checking out this analysis by Mark Wogenrich ’90 of The Morning Call and this New York Times story about the future of the Big Ten, which adds Maryland and Rutgers—and a new division configuration—next season.

In other sports: The men’s soccer team lost 2-0 to New Mexico in the Sweet 16, but it finished the season with a 13-6-2 record and with a long road trip—nearly 5,000 miles in the air, 600 on the road in the NCAA tournament. … The women’s volleyball team finished its regular season with a four-set victory over long-time nemesis Nebraska in a match-up of two Top 10 programs in Lincoln, and it will, as usual, open the NCAA tournament at home, 7:30 p.m. Friday against LIU Brooklyn. … The men’s basketball team advanced to the final of the Barclays Center Classic but fell to Ole Miss, 79-76, despite 23 points from D.J. Newbill. … Tournament MVP Maggie Lucas led the women’s basketball team to the championship of the Junkajoo Jam in the Bahamas, where the players also scored some quality time with some friendly dolphins.

Happy Birthday to Mike the Mailman! (via @pennstate)

Happy Birthday to Mike the Mailman!
(via @pennstate)

Legal update: A couple of months ago, former president Graham Spanier requested “a bill of particulars,” regarding the charges he is facing in the wake of the Sandusky scandal. The prosecution answered last week, and although most of Spanier’s requests were denied, the lawyers did provide a list of what they called Spanier’s false statements in his April 2011 testimony before a grand jury investigating Jerry Sandusky ’67, ’71g. Charlie Thompson of The Patriot-News does a nice job here summarizing the legalese. Next up in the case against Spanier, Gary Schultz ’71, ’75g, and Tim Curley ’76, ’78g: a hearing on several pre-trial matters, including the defense’s motion to quash the testimony of former university council Cynthia Baldwin ’66, ’74g, is scheduled for the week of Dec. 16.

“Mom away from home:” That’s what the two-time national champion Lionettes dance team members call Sue Cacciotti Sherburne ’95g, ’09g, their director, who’s also assistant director of the Morgan Academic Support System for athletes. Chris Rosenblum of the Centre Daily Times writes that Sherburne “gives the Lionettes tools for moving through life as well as they do through space.”

Lori Shontz, senior editor

December 2, 2013 at 2:01 pm Leave a comment

Spanier Charged in Sandusky Scandal

For months, Penn Staters have been wondering whether former president Graham Spanier would ever be charged in connection with the Sandusky scandal.  That question was answered Thursday, as state attorney general Linda Kelly announced that Spanier, Tim Curley ’76, ’78g, and Gary Schultz ’71, ’75g had engaged in a “conspiracy of silence” to cover up allegations of child sexual abuse against Jerry Sandusky ’66, ’71g.

The attorney general added charges against Curley and Schultz, and now all three men are facing five charges: perjury, obstruction of justice, endangering the welfare of children, criminal conspiracy, and failure to report suspected child abuse.

“This was not a mistake by these men,” Kelly said during a news conference that started at noon. “It was not an oversight. It was not misjudgment on their part. This was a conspiracy of silence by top officials, working to actively conceal the truth, with total disregard for the children who were Sandusky’s victims.”

You can download a PDF of the 59-page presentment by clicking here, or you can read the attorney general’s news release by clicking here.

The university put Spanier, still a tenured professor who had been on sabbatical, on administrative leave; you can read the official statement by clicking here.

Spanier’s lawyers responded by calling the charges politically motivated and the timing—just five days before the election—suspect. Their statement, which you can read by clicking here, says in part: “The people of this Commonwealth, and the next Attorney General, should be outraged by this blatantly political, transparently vindictive, last-minute act of cowardice and desperation.”

Curley and Schultz are scheduled to be arraigned at 2 p.m. Friday in Harrisburg; Spanier’s arraignment is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7.

Lori Shontz, senior editor

November 1, 2012 at 4:04 pm 2 comments

The Freeh Report, and its Fallout

“The evidence clearly shows, in our view, an active agreement to conceal.”

Of all the answers former FBI director Louis Freeh gave today after the release of his group’s 267-page report on the Sandusky scandal, this might have been the most blunt. The report’s findings center on a Penn State leadership culture devoid of accountability at the highest level, in which a handful of men—Graham Spanier, Tim Curley ’76, ’78g,  Gary Schultz ’71, ’75g,  and Joe Paterno—failed in their responsibility to expose a serial pedophile. Their motivation, in Freeh’s words, was “avoiding the consequences of bad publicity.”

The Board of Trustees is cited as well for a failure to press for answers and hold the university’s administration accountable. The picture presented is clear: Jerry Sandusky ’66, ’71g was the monster in all this, but he was enabled, directly or not, by many others who had the power to stop him.

On Thursday, as throughout the scandal, much of the attention focused on Paterno’s accountability. On this, Freeh was careful but direct. “We have a great deal of respect for Mr. Paterno, and condolences for his family on their loss. He’s a person with a great legacy, terrific legacy… he, as someone once said, made perhaps the worst mistake of his life. We’re not singling him out. We’re putting him in a category of three other people who were major leaders of Penn State. He was also a major leader of Penn State. The facts are the facts… There’s a whole bunch of evidence here. We’re saying he was a major part of an active attempt to conceal… I regret that. But what my report says is what the evidence and the facts show. We laid that out as fairly and clearly as we can.”

The reactions from elsewhere in the Penn State community followed later in the day. Late Thursday morning, the Paterno family released a statement that defended its patriarch. “The idea that any sane, responsible adult would knowingly cover up for a child predator is impossible to accept,” it reads. “The far more realistic conclusion is that many people didn’t fully understand what was happening and underestimated or misinterpreted events.”

The family statement goes on: “Joe Paterno wasn’t perfect. He made mistakes and he regretted them. He is still the only leader to step forward and say that with the benefit of hindsight he wished he had done more. To think, however, that he would have protected Jerry Sandusky to avoid bad publicity is simply not realistic.”

Penn State president Rod Erickson and the university trustees met the media in Scranton in mid-afternoon. Board chair Karen Peetz ’77 and Ken Frazier ’75, who led the board’s investigative panel, both emphasized the trustees’ collective accountability in the scandal. Said Frazier, “We, the Penn State Board of Trustees, failed to provide proper oversight for the university’s operations.” Peetz echoed that statement, but said no trustees planned to resign, focusing on the acknowledgment of culpability as the first step in moving forward.

Both Peetz and Frazier addressed Paterno, commending his accomplishments and his massive positive impact on the university. But Peetz also acknowledged the “clarity that comes out of that report, that shows 61 years of excellent service to the university is now marred.”

The Board’s official statement on the Freeh Report, including details of action already taken and future plans, can be found here.

The public response to the report was immediate and harsh, much of it damning of Paterno and demanding NCAA sanctions against the Penn State football program. In Oregon, Nike announced that Paterno’s name would no longer adorn the childcare center at its headquarters. Phil Knight, the Nike founder and longtime Paterno family friend, said in a statement, “According to the investigation, it appears Joe made missteps that led to heartbreaking consequences. I missed that Joe missed it, and I am extremely saddened on this day. My love for Joe and his family remains.”

Ryan Jones, senior editor

July 12, 2012 at 5:46 pm 13 comments

Tim Curley has Lung Cancer

The ongoing series of events here at Penn State took yet another turn this afternoon with the revelation that athletic director Tim Curley ’76, ’78g, currently on administrative leave, has lung cancer.

The Harrisburg Patriot-News has the story here. Tim’s wife, Melinda ’77, made a statement to that paper confirming that he had part of a lung removed in 2010. “This is a personal and private matter that has affected our family since June 2010,” the statement said. “He has not required chemotherapy or radiation, however, doctors continue to monitor his condition.”

Melinda Curley’s statement also said:  “During this difficult time, Tim did not want his health to be a distraction and has been dealing with this privately.”

Former football coach Joe Paterno also has been fighting what his family calls a treatable form of lung cancer that was diagnosed in November.

Lung cancer is a tough one. Our best wishes to both Tim and Joe.

Tina Hay, editor

January 11, 2012 at 5:56 pm 2 comments

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