Posts filed under ‘Sandusky scandal’

‘A Norm of Caring’: Experts Discuss Child Abuse Prevention

pinwheelsThe HUB Auditorium was silent.

Jennie Noll, director of Penn State’s Network on Child Protection and Well-Being, had just asked if anyone in the audience knew how many children in the United States were affected each year by abuse. Not one person raised a hand.

Noll revealed the answer: nearly 2 million. Silence again.

“How come we don’t know that?” asked Noll. “How come everyone doesn’t know that?”

That difficult question was the focus of last night’s panel discussion, “Making a Difference, Every Day… Preventing Child Abuse Begins With You.” At the event, sponsored in part by the Alumni Association, keynote speaker James Hmurovich, CEO and president of Prevent Child Abuse America, led an honest, emotional discussion about the issues of child abuse, neglect, and maltreatment — and the ways communities can keep kids safe. Some highlights from Hmurovich’s address:

-Because of his background in the Indiana Department of Corrections, Hmurovich became aware of the strong link between child abuse and juvenile delinquency. When he learned that 63 percent of the girls and boys in the Indiana juvenile correction system had been abused as children, “I started to put together the puzzle pieces,” he says.

-In his work with the Child Welfare Department, Hmurovich recalls talking with women who were able to successfully get off welfare. In describing how they did it, he says, their stories all began with the same phrase: “Someone took the time to …” Hmurovich’s takeway: It’s up to us, individually and as a community, to “create a norm of caring.”

-Hmurovich says federal legislators must create public policy and provide tools for parents and caregivers to ensure healthy childhood development, he says. “Our public policy in the U.S. isn’t exactly where it should be.”

Later in the evening, as part of the panel discussion, Montgomery County assistant district attorney and Alumni Association vice president Kevin Steele ’92g talked about the importance of child advocacy centers, like the ones he’s helped establish throughout Pennsylvania with non-profit group Mission Kids. Because these centers employ “investigative teams” of experts to interview children after abuse, victims aren’t forced to retell their stories to multiple people during the legal process — an experience that’s often painful, he says. The goal of Mission Kids and programs like it, explained Steele, is not only to achieve justice, but to promote healing for victims of abuse.

Steele also encouraged students in the audience to stay involved with child abuse prevention programs even after graduation, explaining that many PSAA chapters are active with child protection organizations around the country.

At the end of the evening, guests were invited to take blue pinwheels — a symbol, explained Hmurovich, of “every child’s right to a happy, healthy childhood.”

Mary Murphy, associate editor

 

April 24, 2014 at 3:11 pm Leave a comment

The Penn Stater Daily — April 3, 2014

Three Questions Project: It’s that time of year again: Voting for this year’s Board of Trustees election starts April 10 and, as in years past, The Penn Stater asked every candidate three crucial questions about the issues facing Penn State. We’ve compiled their answers, along with more info about each candidate, here.

Denied: The Pennsylvania Supreme Court denied Jerry Sandusky’s appeal for a new trial yesterday, ruling there was “no prejudice” against Sandusky during his 2012 trial for child sexual abuse. In a statement, Attorney General Kathleen Kane said, “We are very pleased with the Supreme Court’s decision. Protecting Pennsylvania’s children is one of my top priorities and I remain committed to seeking justice for all victims of sexual abuse.” Check out the Centre Daily Times’ coverage here

Hot tickets: Here’s a fun one: Onward State is looking back at some of the most memorable concerts in Penn State history. Who knew Janis Joplin made a stop at Rec Hall in 1968? (Also: reading to the end just might help you answer the Alum Stumper in our upcoming issue. Just sayin’.)
Via Devon Fields (@CHOREATOR) on Twitter.

Via Devon Fields (@CHOREATOR) on Twitter.

Eat your heart out, Ellen: OK, so there aren’t any Oscar winners in this selfie, but there is one big Penn State celebrity/mailman — and the stars of the Penn State Thespians’ production of In The Heights, which opens tonight. Retweet away, America!
Mary Murphy, associate editor

 

April 3, 2014 at 12:27 pm Leave a comment

The Penn Stater Daily — March 18, 2014

LadyLionsreaction

In position: The Lady Lions earned their fourth-straight bid in the NCAA tournament, nabbing the No. 3 seed. The team faces No. 14 Wichita State on Sunday at the BJC. And despite the photo (above), shared on Twitter by WJAC’s Matt Maisel (@Matt_Maisel), Maggie Lucas wasn’t the only Lady Lion psyched about last night’s seed announcement; the photo was taken mere milliseconds before the rest of the team burst into cheers. Check out a video of their reaction here.

Good conversation: Vietnam War correspondent and Bronze Star Medal recipient Joseph Galloway is the guest on Thursday’s “Conversations from Penn State,” the WPSU-TV series. Galloway, whose career as a military and war correspondent spans more than 50 years, is also the best-selling author of “We Were Solders, Once… and Young,” on which the 2002 Mel Gibson flick “We Were Soliders” was based. The episode will air at 8 p.m. Thursday on WPSU-TV, and online at http://conversations.psu.edu.

Powerful partner: Some good news coming from Penn State’s partnership with PCAR (Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape), now in its third year: more than 30,000 people affiliated with Penn State have been trained to identify and report child abuse in the past year, and prevention efforts—including more training programs, conferences, and support groups—have been bolstered throughout the state. For more information on Penn State and PCAR’s efforts to prevent child abuse, check out Penn State News‘ coverage here.

Mary Murphy, associate editor 

March 18, 2014 at 11:34 am Leave a comment

The Penn Stater Daily — March 12, 2014

Gift of life: Cheryl Green was a 19-year-old Penn State sophomore when her kidneys failed and she went into cardiac arrest. Two years later she received a transplant with the kidney of her mom, who was 51 at the time. Today, 37 years later, Green is still living with her mother’s kidney, as recounted in this feature from Lancaster Online. “I have an 88-year-old kidney in me,” Green says. “People said it wouldn’t last.”

Another day, another honor for John Urschel: Penn State’s offensive lineman/math genius is a semifinalist for the Sullivan Award, which the AAU awards annually to the nation’s top amateur athlete. Past award winners include everyone from Wilma Rudolph to Bruce Jenner to Tim Tebow. Fan voting counts in choosing the finalists, so click here to cast yours. Voting ends March 23.

Video of the day: Our friends at Onward State, who alerted us to this video, described it as “Dude Writes a Song About David Taylor.” And, yes, that’s true, but Mark Bader’s karaoke version of “Piano Man,” apparently titled “Magicman” in honor of the four-time Big Ten champ’s Twitter handle and nickname, is really so much more. It’s got shutouts to everything from Ed Ruth’s cradle to Cael Sanderson’s bald head, to everyone from Nico Megaludis to the team’s sports information director, Pat Donghia. Taylor gets the best lyric, though: “He’s slick and he’s sleek/And he wrestles complete/except for he never does throws.” Funny and accurate. You’ve really got to see this and hear this to believe it, so click here. Just don’t have the volume on your computer up too high.

Dottie Sandusky speaks: The Today show interviewed Dottie Sandusky, who says her husband did not sexually abuse young boys in their basement. She also showed interviewer Matt Lauer around the basement. If you want to watch, here the link to the seven-minute segment that aired Wednesday morning, and here’s the link to the full 50-minute interview posted later in the morning. The interview is receiving some criticism online, notably from Jennifer Storm ’02, executive director of Pennsylvania’s Victim/Witness Assistance Program and an abuse survivor herself. She tweeted, “It’s morally reprehensible that @todayshow takes its victims to crime scene where many young men were sexually abused by Sandusky” and “sexual assault victims deserve to be believed & once cases are concluded left alone to heal, not be revictimized by @todayshow.”

Lori Shontz, senior editor

March 12, 2014 at 1:15 pm Leave a comment

The Penn Stater Daily — March 11, 2014

Start ‘em early: Here’s a cool story from yesterday’s Morning Call on the rise of “mini-thons” at high schools all over Pennsylvania — 136 this year alone. And just like the larger THON, the events are raising big money for the Four Diamonds Fund: The Bethlehem Area School District raised more than $20,000 at the eight-hour dance marathon last Saturday.

Speaking out: Dottie Sandusky will appear tomorrow morning on NBC’s Today in what looks to be an emotional interview with Matt Lauer. In a promo released this morning, Jerry Sandusky’s wife tells Lauer that her husband, who has been in maximum security prison since June 2012, misses “family meals” and “time with grandkids.”

Dynamic duo: A couple of big honors for men’s basketball player D.J. Newbill and Tim Frazier; they’re two of the 2014 All-Big Ten award winners, announced yesterday. Newbill, who’s ranked second in the Big Ten, earned Second Team All-Big Ten honors; Frazier, ranked ninth in the Big Ten, received third-team recognition.

Franklin moves in: Sunday’s Pittsburgh Tribune featured this story on James Franklin, who talks about the move from Nashville to State College—and his childhood, which included lots of time with his extended family in the ‘Burgh. Here’s  a fun fact: According to Franklin’s cousin Karen Zellars, who’s quoted in the piece, little James could make one killer apple pie.

Mary Murphy, associate editor

 

March 11, 2014 at 11:12 am Leave a comment

The Penn Stater Daily — Feb. 27, 2014

Lessons from crises: As president of Bank of New York Mellon and chairman of the Penn State Board of Trustees, Karen Peetz ’77 is familiar with crises. She reflects on both the financial crisis and the Sandusky scandal in a piece from today’s CNNMoney: Postcards blog and shares lessons learned from both ordeals. Among her remarks: “We have to show we understand that the world in which we operate has changed and that we embrace new ways of thinking and operating. In other words, we have to prove ourselves — prove ourselves worthy of trust.”

All the right moves: If you’ve got a couple free minutes, check out this video featuring a TedXPSU project from earlier this week. On Tuesday, the music school’s chamber orchestra set up shop in the HUB, and passersby were invited to conduct the group in a classical performance. Several students jumped right in—and delivered some surprisingly convincing performances.

More than hockey: We told you about ESPN‘s John Buccigross’s visit to Penn State a few weeks ago, when the famed sportscaster took in a men’s hockey game at Pegula. Buccigross talked more about his Penn State experience with the Centre County Gazette for this piece, posted this morning. A few of his favorite things about State College: Cafe 210, Damon’s mozzarella sticks, and the Pegula Ice Arena’s spacious urinals. Yes, you read that right.

Drop the bass: Ever found yourself wondering if Penn State has a student group for all the bass-fishing enthusiasts on campus? Well, here is your answer, courtesy of Onward State.

Mary Murphy, associate editor

 

February 27, 2014 at 12:42 pm 12 comments

Eric Barron: In His Own Words

DSC_4680_Eric_BarronPresident-elect Eric Barron seems to like automotive analogies. He rattled off two when he spoke to the Board of Trustees on Monday afternoon, immediately after being named Penn State’s 18th president:

Auto Analogy No. 1: When Barron was learning to drive, his father told him to lift up his head and look not at the hood ornament, but down the road: “You will discover it is much easier to get where you are trying to go.” Barron found that the tip resulted in “a much better driving experience” and also turned out to be a good life philosophy. “Our job, all of our job, is to see down the road, sense the future, and ensure that this great institution is at the forefront of success and achievement.” (more…)

February 17, 2014 at 9:06 pm Leave a comment

President-Elect Eric Barron: ‘I Have a Lot to Learn’

President-elect Eric Barron and his wife, Molly, are introduced at Monday's special Board of Trustees meeting.

President-elect Eric Barron and his wife, Molly, are introduced at Monday’s special Board of Trustees meeting.

Eric Barron spent 20 years at Penn State, a larger chunk of his professional career than he’s spent anywhere else, by a lot. He called Penn State’s current president, Rod Erickson, formerly his boss in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, “much more than that—he was my mentor.” He said at every job he’s held since leaving Penn State, including his current position as Florida State president, he has taken two lessons he learned here, the “push for excellence and the power of community.”

“In so many ways,” Barron said Monday afternoon, just after being appointed Penn State’s 18th president, “I never left Penn State.”

Which doesn’t mean, Barron stressed, that he knows everything there is to know about this place. He left University Park in 2006 (click here to learn about what he did during the past eight years), and he knows the campus and the entire Penn State system have changed a lot since then.

“I have a lot to learn,” he said. “I want to make sure that I take the time to learn everything that I can. I think it’s a mistake to think that just because I was here eight years ago and for a while, or that because I’m paying attention to what’s going on in the world, that I know everything and can make decisions.”

Barron gave that answer in responding to a question about how he would bridge the divide in Penn State’s community that is one of the lasting effects of the Sandusky scandal, but his need to learn was a theme he sounded throughout his brief media tour Monday afternoon, even when asked about his goals for Penn State.

“The first thing I’d like to do,” he said, “is tap each dean on the shoulder and say, ‘I’d like to spend half a day with you. Show me your physical plant. Tell me those things you brag about. Those things you struggle with.’ Because I do think it’s a mistake to sit here and say, ‘I’ve been a university president for four years and directed a national lab, I know what to do.’ It doesn’t usually work that way. (more…)

February 17, 2014 at 8:02 pm 2 comments

BOT Chair Re-Elected and Other Meeting Highlights

Also at today's BOT meeting: new football coach James Franklin stopped by; here, he's welcomed by board chair Keith Masser.

Also at today’s BOT meeting: new football coach James Franklin stopped by; here, he’s welcomed by board chair Keith Masser.

This was old school. A two-hour Board of Trustees meeting. No contentious votes. Only one participant in the public comment session. An uncontested election for board chair.

The media covering the meeting joked that we didn’t have much to write about.

Partially, of course, that’s because there’s more discussion and fleshing out of ideas during the committee meetings, held the day before the full board meeting. Flat out, there’s just more to write about from those. Partially that’s because the major issue confronting the board these days is governance reform, and that’s something they talked about in an executive session yesterday with governance consultant Holly Gregory.

And it’s not like nothing happened. Here’s a quick rundown:

Masser re-elected board chair: This is a short term, just six months, because the board previously voted to change its annual meeting—at which officers are elected for one-year terms—from January to July. Just this once, the board needed to have a stopgap election to fill the six months from January to July. Incumbent Keith Masser ’73 was unanimously voted in. Also voted in were the other board officers, Penn State staffers. Vice chair Paul Silvis ’06g was elected in July to fill a vacant spot, so he already had six months remaining in his term.

Executive committee spots filled: The three trustees put forth by the governance committee—Kathleen Casey ’88, Donald Cotner ’71, and Richard Dandrea ’77—to join the executive committee as at-large members were approved. There was no discussion, and no one nominated anyone else.

Public comment: The number of speakers at public comment continued to dwindle with only one—Wendy Silverwood, whose anger at the Freeh report and trustees was palpable and who asked the board to marginalize the Freeh report and apologize to those harmed by it, including the Paterno family, lettermen, and Penn State community. She also suggested that Louis Freeh speak this spring at the third annual conference sponsored by the Network for Child Protection and Well-Being. He could be part of a panel, she said, with some of the people quoted in the Paterno family’s report—former attorney general Dick Thornburgh, Jim Clemente, and two doctors.

“The Freeh report missed a critical opportunity to educate the public on the identification of child sexual victimization and instead used the platform created by this scandal to sensationalize the blaming of Joe Paterno,” she said. “This was a terrible disservice not only to Penn Staters, but also to all parents, grandparents, and children in our state.”

Susan McHale speaks about the Network on Child Protection and Well-Being.

Susan McHale speaks about the Network on Child Protection and Well-Being.

Network for Child Protection and Well-Being: Susan McHale, director of the Social Science Institute, presented an informational report on the Network for Child Protection and Well-Being (which is housed in her institute). She built off an introduction from provost and executive vice president Nicholas Jones, who noted other examples of Penn State’s commitment to children, including the Children, Youth, and Families Consortium that was started in 1998. But when the Sandusky scandal broke, Penn State had “less than a handful” of experts in child maltreatment, and the university immediately began to remedy the situation. It made a cluster hire of 12 faculty to beef up what the center could do.

Application numbers rising: In his report to the board, president Rod Erickson said that undergraduate applications are up 19 percent at University Park and 7 percent at other campuses. The university has also received a record number of applications to the Schreyer Honors College: 3,277 students have applied for 300 spots.

Lori Shontz, senior editor

January 17, 2014 at 7:28 pm 4 comments

The BOT’s Governance Consultant Speaks

Holly Gregory wanted to clear up one thing right off the bat. The lawyer hired to facilitate the Board of Trustees’ discussion about the more difficult parts of governance reform—the size of the board, the constituencies represented on the board, the qualifications needed to serve on the board, etc.—opened the trustees’ retreat Thursday afternoon with, as she put it, a disclosure:

She’s not a Penn State graduate.

That was a soft opening, to be sure. But as Gregory continued, she laid out her philosophy of good governance and how she sees her consulting role. She explained the focus of her law practice—working with boards of directors and trustees, at both for-profit and nonprofit organizations, and said that includes other universities.

She acknowledged the progress Penn State has already made in governance reform, but she added, “There are a number of areas where observers have continued to call for change. We have to listen.”

When governance committee chair Keith Eckel announced the hiring of Gregory in November, he stressed that he was looking for not for an expert in the field, but a facilitator, someone who could guide the board—which is divided—in what he has called the ongoing and continuous work of determining how best to govern the university.

He reiterated that Thursday, when he introduced Gregory and opened the retreat:

“The right model for Penn State will be the Penn State model,” he said. “It is within every one of our hands, the ability to shape that. Holly is the expert, and I have great confidence in her ability. But perhaps her most important talent is one of facilitation.

“There may be differences among us, but I am convinced there is one thing that unites all of us, and that is that we want the best for Penn State. Our viewpoints may differ in what that definition is, but we want the best for Penn State. And this effort is to create and in many cases reaffirm processes we may already have as the best Penn State model.”

And Gregory immediately picked up one of Eckel’s main themes: “Governance is a work in progress,” she said. “It never really ends. You never really say you’re done. You continually need to think about how this board functions and operates and the rules it has in place to guide it.”

The first part of the retreat was open to the public; by my count, 12 people—including me, four other reporters, and two Penn State public information staffers—attended the session, which lasted for about 40 minutes. The trustees were in one room; we watched a video hookup from the room next door that showed whoever was addressing the trustees. The rest of the retreat took place in a closed executive session.

Among the points that Gregory made in the public portion of the retreat:

Fiduciary duty: As a lawyer, she sees fiduciary duty as the underpinning of everything a trustee does. “Not as an ending,” she said, “but as a starting point.”

Disagreements are OK: Tensions in “key relationships” at an institution that has undergone a crisis are not unusual. “In fact,” she said, “they are the norm.”  Gregory called herself “agnostic” on the Sandusky scandal and aftermath and stressed that “disagreement isn’t something to be afraid of. It’s something to be valued.”

Speaking with “one voice:” That said, she also stressed how important it is that the board speaks publicly with one voice. They key, she said, is to figure out a way to get the “benefits of vigorous debate”—meaning, in private—“without causing harm to the university.”

Three duties of trustees: She laid out three duties that should guide trustees: obedience, meaning that everything the trustees do should be tied directly to the university’s mission as described in the charter and bylaws; care, meaning to put in the time needed to fully understand issues and to do due diligence; and loyalty, meaning avoiding conflicts of interests—or identifying ones that can’t be avoided and protecting the university’s reputation. “After all,” Gregory said, “that’s one of a university’s primary assets.”

She continued: “The good news is that perfection is not required. These duties, they expect a very, very high standard from trustees. But the law recognizes that the board, acting in real time and in response to real emerging issues, will not always make the best decision. You’re going to get it wrong. You’re going to make mistakes sometimes. As long as you’re acting with reasonable and prudent care, you as trustees will not be held liable.”

A culture to strive for: Gregory characterized the culture the board should strive to meet with these phrases: Mindful of fiduciary duties. Future-focused: anticipatory, not reactive. Revitalizing, not entrenched. Diverse and inclusive.

She ended with this: “I can’t emphasize enough the value that comes from having the opportunity to debate a variety of viewpoints.”

Lori Shontz, senior editor

January 17, 2014 at 9:44 am 2 comments

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