Posts filed under ‘Penn Staters in the news media’

The Penn Stater Daily — April 16, 2014

Screen-Shot-2014-04-15-at-10.26.01-AM-580x348Herb Hand Pizza Crawl! I have no idea what kind of an offensive line coach Herb Hand is, although we’re soon going to find out, given that the Nittany Lions barely have enough linemen to fill a two-deep. But there’s no doubt that the guy is a social media genius. Hand tweeted in February about stopping at Canyon Pizza for lunch. This understandably shocked the Penn State corner of Twitter, many of whom had no idea Canyon served food before, oh, 11 p.m. or so. Soon everyone was tweeting their favorite pizza places at Hand, and then Onward State got involved, and now there’s a glorious result: the Herb Hand Pizza Crawl. For $20, on April 27 you can accompany Hand and, as Onward put it, “explore the State College pizza scene.”

You also get a limited edition T-shirt, which I very much hope looks like the logo (above) I borrowed from Onward State’s website, and the proceeds go to Uplifting Athletes and Bands 4 RAINN. I imagine this will fill up soon, so if you’re interested, sign up quickly.

Dare I hope that the next such charity event is a James Franklin Balloon Party?

Good writing alert: If I’ve got a “coaching tree,” consisting of the young journalists I’ve mentored when they were students, among the most excellent branches are Jenny Vrentas ’06 and former Penn Stater intern Emily Kaplan ’13, who are colleagues at Sports Illustrated‘s MMQB website. So when Jenny tweets a story written by Emily, I click. This morning’s offering is a piece that uses the upcoming film Draft Day as a look at female executives in the NFL. Spoiler: Real life isn’t quite as it’s portrayed in the movie.

Ready for prime time: The Nittany Lions are going to get significant exposure in prime time this fall: The Ohio State game on Oct. 25 will start at 8 p.m. That caps an odd October for the team, which has two off weeks (Oct. 4 and 18) and two prime-time games. The game at Michigan on Oct. 11, as previously announced, will begin at 7 p.m.

Lori Shontz, senior editor

 

 

 

April 16, 2014 at 10:54 am Leave a comment

Getting Serious About Conserving Water

Videographer, Mark Stitzer focuses on a heron in Tanner Springs Park, Portland.

Videographer Mark Stitzer focuses on a heron in Tanner Springs Park, Portland.

A couple of weeks ago, I found myself in a discussion group with eight other Penn State students talking about climate issues. It was part of a World in Conversation program, which encouraged us to be truthful. We talked about recycling and why it’s not a top priority for us. Our consensus: because recycling doesn’t incorporate instant gratification.

We care about eating healthy, for example, because we almost instantly see weight loss or improved health. But what actually happens when we take the time to separate our glass and plastic bottles to put them in the correct recycling containers? Are we making a positive impact on Earth by putting the Canyon Pizza box into the cardboard recycling bin?

And then, by coincidence, The Penn Stater editors asked me to attend the premiere of “Water Blues, Green Solutions,” a collaboration between Penn State Public Media and Penn State’s Sustainability Institute. The documentary wasn’t about recycling per se, but it was a powerful depiction of the positive effects of caring about water. I believe the documentary was able to achieve this because the people who were involved in making it were just like so many of us. They weren’t completely versed on the details of green infrastructure or conservation of aquifers, either.

“I share my ignorance with others who don’t know about water,” director Frank Christopher told the audience. In the past, he’s worked on films about war, health care, and even Cirque du Soleil, but he thought that it was time to be responsible and communicate the urgency of why we need to think about how we use and protect our water sources.

Members of the Penn State Water Brigades, a club on campus dedicated to improving access to clean water and sanitation, had a table set up in the lobby of the theatre before the screening. The co-president of the club, junior Deidre Carlson, might have summed up the urgency of our water crisis best. Carlson said, “In the U.S., we have our own water problems, and they aren’t being addressed. We have issues in our own backyard.”

Diedre Carlson of Penn State Water Brigades at the premiere.

Diedre Carlson of Penn State Water Brigades at the premiere.

“Water Blues, Green Solutions” addressed this issue from multiple angles. The documentary leads viewers on a tour of four cities – Philadelphia, Portland, San Antonio, and the Bronx, all of which are dealing with unique water dilemmas.

I lived in Philadelphia all summer and I didn’t know the city’s water department was beginning to implement green infrastructure until I watched the documentary. Portland, on the other hand, is already a leader in creating green projects and is serving as example to others. San Antonio’s water crisis might have been the most drastic: Droughts have plagued the area causing some lakes to almost completely dry up. The visual of a barely there lake puts the water crisis into context pretty fast. Perhaps the most optimistic view of green solutions was in the Bronx’s efforts of cleaning up the Bronx River, which created new jobs and opportunities for community members. In short, all of these cities are working with nature instead of against it. By doing so, they’ve created new jobs and saved lots of money. Green Solutions may not be instant but it is possible, present, and important.

It also helps that the documentary didn’t take a doom and gloom approach. It most certainly was not the PETA approach. You know, where they show you pictures of beaten animals to pluck on your heartstrings.

Instead, videographer Mark Stitzer ’02 took the approach of having individuals in the cities directly tell the audience their stories, including a teacher in Philadelphia conducting class on a new eco-friendly play ground and a  woman in the Bronx enjoying her new job creating green infrastructure. I got a sense that people are taking away something positive from solving their water blues.

Stitzer captures shots of Greenfield Elementary School in Philadelphia, one of the first schools to adopt a self-sustaining green play ground.

Stitzer captures shots of Philadelphia’s Greenfield Elementary School, one of the first schools to adopt a self-sustaining green play ground.

Those involved in the making of this film said their ultimate hope is for the documentary to create civic engagement and for it to urge people to seek their own green solutions for their water blues. The precursor to this project, another documentary titled “Liquid Assets,” reached every member of Congress. It’s just a matter of what people do with the knowledge.

If I took anything out of this film, it’s that you can transform sewage into water cleaner than what’s sold in a bottle. I’m just kidding. Not quite. No matter, this documentary teaches you many things about water that pertain to you and your everyday life a lot more than you think.

The broadcasting schedule of “Water Blues, Green Solutions” is updated weekly and is available here.

Kelly Godzik, intern

February 27, 2014 at 4:22 pm Leave a comment

The Penn Stater Daily — Oct. 24, 2013

From news to features, your daily dose of everything Penn State.

More than qualified: Penn State announced yesterday that Amr Salah Elnashai will serve as the new dean in the College of Engineering. Elnashai is currently head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where his list of accomplishments is impressive. “The breadth of his expertise and international reputation will further Penn State’s position at the forefront of engineering education,” said President Rodney Erickson. Elnashai will begin his tenure on Jan. 13.

Good sports: Head trauma in professional sports has been big news lately, and Sports Illustrated is devoting two weeks to the topic on their NFL-specific blog, MMQB. You might recognize the names of two writers who contributed to the special report: We told you about sportswriter Jenny Vrentas ’06 this summer, when she scored the gig with SI; in her piece, she explores the latest in helmet technology. And Emily Kaplan ’13, a fantastic writer who also happens to be a former Penn Stater intern, covers how head injuries have impacted one Georgia high-school team. Way to go, Jenny and Emily.

Raising the roof: The big news around here yesterday afternoon: the announcement of the senior class gift. The HUB Green Roof Terrace is described as an “open-air terrace,” which will provide additional seating and a scenic view of Mt. Nittany atop the HUB-Robeson Center. The roof will offer some environmentally friendly benefits, as well. Check out our intern Maggie McGlinchy’s post for more info.

Via Instagram @psbehrend

Via Instagram @psbehrend

Snow no: After growing up in upstate New York, I’m no stranger to snow in October (or any other month, really). But coming off the past week of unseasonably warm temperatures around here, seeing even a tiny bit of the white stuff is jarring. Snow hasn’t hit State College yet, but Penn State Behrend students woke up to light dusting this morning, as evidenced by this photo, from the @psbehrend Instagram account. Something tells me we ain’t seen nothin’ yet.

Mary Murphy, associate editor

October 24, 2013 at 11:15 am Leave a comment

My Friend, the Bionic Reporter

1240246_10151878891834664_1073070009_nI first knew BJ Reyes ’95 as a fellow sportswriter at The Daily Collegian. A diminutive Filipino by way of Cleveland, he was a few years older than the rest of us due to the health problems—namely, cancer—that had forced him to postpone college (he’s battled diabetes most of his life, as well). He was also smart, funny, and a great guy to hang out with—the sort of friend around whom many of our most memorable college stories revolved.

Years ago, he moved to Honolulu and established himself as a pillar of Aloha State journalism—he’s currently a political reporter for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser—but we’ve managed to stay in pretty good contact, so I knew that he’d never completely shaken the myriad health problems, repeat surgeries, and related complications that he’d dealt with most of his life.

So it wasn’t a complete shock when (more…)

September 12, 2013 at 2:41 pm Leave a comment

Launching the Internet—by Balloon

Steven Levy ’74g went to New Zealand to report his latest story for Wired—a tale of how Google is trying to bring Internet access to some pretty remote locations using a pretty wild scheme. It involves putting antennas into solar-power balloons and launching them into the stratosphere. Google calls the idea Project Loon, because it’s kind of crazy. But it just might work.

Levy writes that Project Loon could “provide Internet to a significant chunk of the world’s 5 billion unconnected souls, enriching their lives with vital news, precious educational materials, lifesaving health information, and images of grumpy cats.”

Levy’s story is accompanied by some cool photos of the project.

Tina Hay, editor

June 17, 2013 at 9:52 am 3 comments

Obituary: Former Ebony Editor Herbert Nipson

One of Penn State’s most prominent journalism grads, Herbert Nipson ’40, has died at the age of 95.

Nipson spent 38 years at Ebony magazine, the last 15 of those as executive editor. He started as an associate editor there in 1949 and was named editor in 1972, so he was on staff throughout an important time: the U.S. civil-rights movement.

He’s credited with expanding the magazine’s reach substantially during that time, according to an obituary in the Los Angeles Times: “By the time he retired … the magazine enjoyed national recognition and mainstream appeal for both its issue-oriented reporting and its cultural coverage.”

Nipson, a Penn State Distinguished Alumnus, grew up in Clearfield, Pa. He’s thought to be the first black student on the staff of the Collegian; he started there in 1936 and eventually was named assistant sports editor. He also ran cross-country for Penn State.

You can read more about Nipson at BlackHistory.psu.edu.

Tina Hay, editor

December 30, 2011 at 7:14 pm Leave a comment

Tom Verducci Gets Stung

Best known as a respected baseball writer for Sports Illustrated, Tom Verducci ’82 also serves as a field reporter for TBS during the MLB playoffs. It was in his TV role Thursday night that Verducci ended up in the winning locker room following the Detroit Tigers’ divisional series victory over the New York Yankees. He was trying to interview pitcher Jose Valverde, who earned the series-clinching save for the Tigers. Here’s a look at the conditions Verducci was forced to work under:

There are many more difficult jobs in the world, and I’m sure Verducci knows how lucky he is. But I can tell you, having spent time in victorious NBA locker rooms during my own sportswriting days: Getting champagne in your eye stings like crazy.

Ryan Jones, senior editor

October 7, 2011 at 11:46 am Leave a comment

On Steve Jobs

Of the many obituaries today for Steve Jobs, two of the most relevant and (I’d imagine) widely read were written by Penn Staters. Ted Anthony ’95 was given the task of summing up Jobs’ life by the Associated Press, and it’s a great read. He leads with a memory of the day the Apple co-founder introduced the Macintosh to the world. “In dark suit and bowtie, he is a computing-era carnival barker—eyebrows bouncing, hands gesturing, smile seductive and coy and a bit annoying. It’s as if he’s on his first date with an entire generation of consumers. And, in a way, he is.” If you haven’t already, you can read the AP obit here.

Then there’s Steven Levy ’74g, who has spent much of his career documenting the innovation that made Jobs a tech icon and Apple one of the wealthiest companies—and arguably the most influential—on the planet. Levy now writes for Wired, and his obit gets right to the point: “It had taken a while for the world to realize what an amazing treasure Steve Jobs was. But Jobs knew it all along.” Levy’s piece is here.

Ryan Jones, senior editor

October 6, 2011 at 4:24 pm 1 comment

Michael Weinreb’s New Beginnings

Michael Weinreb ’94 is one of our go-to feature writers, and his terrific piece on Rosey Grier ’56 in our July/August issue (out in a few weeks) is a great example of why. Among Mike’s other projects (including books) is a new gig with Grantland.com, the big-deal, ESPN-affiliated sports and culture website that debuted earlier this week. Mike’s first Grantland piece is up today, and it’s loaded with Penn State references; one of those is of Mike sneaking away from the reception at a friend’s wedding years ago to watch the Nittany Lions play Wisconsin on a portable TV hidden in a coat closet.

That was my wedding, actually. On Sunday, I’ll be in Long Island to watch Mike get married; the bride-to-be is a Northwestern grad, but we approve of her anyway.

Ryan Jones, senior editor

June 10, 2011 at 1:40 pm Leave a comment

‘Lifting the Shroud’ on Al Jazeera English

Back in March, we talked with Jeff Ballou ’90, deputy news editor for Al Jazeera English. At the time, AJE was attracting thousands of new viewers for its 24/7 coverage of the Egypt riots. Jeff explained how the positive attention was helping to dispel some of Americans’ misconceptions about the Arab network—and expressed his hope that the public would continue to embrace it.

An editorial in the May/June Columbia Journalism Review echoes Jeff’s thoughts. According to the article, Al Jazeera has earned an unfair “anti-American” label, and the hostility from cable systems—who are wary about picking up the network—is unwarranted. (Right now the only cable systems in the U.S. that offer AJE are in Washington, D.C.; Burlington, Vt.; and parts of Ohio.) Americans are hungry for this global perspective, claim the writers, and resistance is based on “racism and Islamophobia.” Check out the quotes from former Nightline reporter David Marash, who says AJE’s fair-minded reporting is “the model of television news coverage.”

Mary Murphy, associate editor

June 9, 2011 at 1:30 pm Leave a comment

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