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A Beginner’s Guide to World War I

WWIopener

The so-called “Great War” is in the spotlight this year, as the world marks the centennial of the start of World War I. For the cover story of our July-August 2014 issue, I talked to Penn State historian Sophie De Schaepdrijver, who has spent much of her career studying the war—its origins, its effects on civilian life, and the changing attitudes people have about its role in history. (That’s the opening spread of our July-August story, above.)

I also asked De Schaeprijver what resources she’d recommend for someone interested in learning more about World War I. We shared five of her suggestions in the magazine; below is a longer, more detailed list.

1. Rites of Spring, a book by Modris Eksteins.“It’s such a great cultural history of the war and what kind of thinking made the war possible. What made people think it was worthwhile? What made them stick it out in the face of so much loss? Those guys on the front came from all walks of life—chicken farmers and teachers, conservatives and socialists, Catholics and Jews—and what is absolutely baffling is how little there was in terms of protest. There’s a saying that behind every soldier is someone holding a gun to his head, but you can’t really say that here—there’s a lot of self-mobilization, people convincing themselves that they should be there.

“Eksteins teases it out, unravels the different strands. It’s a pretty complex book, but accessible and extremely well written. It is the book that sparked my interest in World War I as a societal event, and I return to it quite often.”

2. A Son at the Front, a novel by Edith Wharton. “Probably her least well-known book. It’s written from the perspective of divorced parents whose son is in the war. What I like is that it was pretty much rejected and not seen as an important book, written by a woman, and yet it shows this dual point of view: The parents share this anguish over their son at the front, but they don’t reject the war—they feel it is worth fighting.”

3. Absolute Destruction: Military Culture and the Practices of War in Imperial Germany, a book by Isabel Hull. “This one is pretty academic [Hull is on the faculty at Cornell University], but I like it a lot. It talks about the German military as an organization that develops a culture of its own, and why that tells us a great deal about the violence of the first World War. It allows you to grasp why the violence could get out of hand like this without having to resort to explanations like racism, or describing World War I as merely a prologue to World War II. It’s a ‘think book.’ It brings in the notion of the army as its own organization that’s going to develop its own logic—a nice bit of organizational culture, which is interesting well beyond military history.”

The ruins of Ypres, Belgium, after the war. Image courtesy Great War Primary Document Archive: www.gwpda.org/photos

The ruins of Ypres, Belgium, after the war. Image courtesy Great War Primary Document Archive: http://www.gwpda.org/photos

4. The Regeneration Trilogy, three novels by Pat Parker. “This is fantastic, a contemporary trilogy; one of the three books won the Booker Prize in 1995. The trilogy is about British soldiers, and you see them not at the front but at the home front, being patched up and treated for posttraumatic stress. The author offers a very intelligent reflection on the damage the war does, and she goes into the soldiers’ heads to understand why they want to return to the front. She wrote war books after this, but none as good as this; these are masterpieces.”

5.  World War I Museum, Kansas City. “It’s a great collection, extremely intelligently exhibited. They revamped it a short while ago, and they have a great crew there; it’s just a great educational experience. The building is tremendous; it’s from the 1920s—it was built to be a World War I museum from the start, and the architecture is overwhelming. There’s a lavish circular room on the top floor that houses a panoramic French painting made at the end of World War I, called Panthéon de la Guerre. They made this room just for it. So visiting the museum is an aesthetic as well as educational experience.”

6. War Requiem, an oratorio by Benjamin Britten. “I think it’s brilliant. It was actually composed after World War II, but the text refers to both world wars. It includes the Latin ‘Mass for the Dead’ and poems by Wilfred Owen, who died at the end of World War I and who is for many people—including myself—the greatest poet to come out of that war. There are moments where it’s very jarring, and then there are the soothing notes of the Latin mass. It’s a masterpiece, and I would love to see many performances of it in this centennial year.”

7. A visit to Ypres, Belgium. “Its Flanders Field Museum is in a medieval building that was bombed to complete rubble in the war—as was all of Ypres [pronounced ‘EE-per’]—and rebuilt after the war. Typically after the second world war, things were rebuilt in a boxy modern way, but after World War I, people said, ‘We’re not going to use this as an opportunity to modernize; we are going to recapture what we had. We had gables and canals and cul-de-sacs before, and we’re going to have them again.’ So it’s really quite gorgeous. A stone’s throw away is the Menin Gate, where, every single evening at 8, they stop traffic and buglers sound the ‘Last Post.’ And around the city are major British cemeteries that you can visit on a bicycle or bus tour.”

8. Historial de Grande Guerre, a museum in Péronne, France. “In many ways it’s a completely different experience from the Flanders Field Museum. Péronne is a tiny town, much less lavish than Ypres, and all around it you have the battlefields of the Somme. The museum is a modern one, and it’s my favorite museum. It’s moving, it’s intelligent, and for me it is the exemplary war museum.

“It makes a couple of extremely intelligent choices—for example, the uniforms are not upright on mannequins; they’re down on the floor, spread out, and you walk around them. It shows a kind of helplessness without imposing it upon you. It doesn’t tug at the emotions; it basically asks you to take a step back and contemplate and decide for yourself what you feel. It’s a form of respect—for those who died, for those who grieved for them, and for that generation—that is very admirable.

“There’s a mystery to World War I—what made these people go on—and the more we learn, the more we know we’ll never get to the bottom of it; we can only show bits and pieces. The museum conveys that very well.”

Tina Hay, editor

July 1, 2014 at 10:47 am 3 comments

I Love This Penn Stater’s Graduation Speech

This morning I came across a speech that Bailey Sanders ’14 Med gave at the Penn State College of Medicine graduation ceremony in May. Her peers, the graduating med students, had chosen her to give the student commencement address, and I can see why. I have a fondness for public speakers who are articulate, animated, confident, and funny—and Bailey Sanders is all of those things. (She has the med school dean, Harold Paz, laughing from the start, and eventually she wins over President Eric Barron too.) Can’t wait to see what kind of physician she’ll turn out to be.

Her remarks are eight minutes long and well worth your time.

Tina Hay, editor

June 18, 2014 at 11:56 am 2 comments

Ducks in the Dorms?

You may or may not have seen the announcement that we’re looking for good stories from alumni of their days in the dorms.

Every so often we like to do a story that’s a collection of readers’ memories of their time as a Penn State student. In May-June, for example, we spotlighted alumni memories of classroom incidents that left an impression, and in previous issues we’ve covered everything from IM sports memories to college pranks to tales of getting engaged on campus.

Anyway, right now we’re looking for dorm memories, for a story that will probably run later this year, and on Saturday night I heard a good one. A Class of 1964 grad who came back for her 50th reunion was telling me that she and her dorm mates kept a few ducks on their residence-hall floor! Apparently the students would use towels to block the drains in the common shower area, then let the showers run until the floor was flooded, giving the ducks a pond-like setting in which to hang out. The rest of the time, the ducks lived in someone’s dorm-room closet.

Needless to say, I strongly encouraged her to send us that story. And if you have a good story from your dorm days, please send it to us. Our email address is heypennstater (at) psu (dot) edu, or you can fill out the form below. You have until July 21 to get your stories in.

Tina Hay, editor

 

June 9, 2014 at 1:45 pm Leave a comment

A Night for Celebrating

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I had a chance to attend the official closing ceremony on Saturday evening for the university’s $2 billion fundraising campaign, “For the Future: The Campaign for Penn State Students,” and it was such a happy occasion. There was a lot to celebrate—raising more than $2 billion is huge under any circumstances, much less the fact that the campaign spanned the economic recession of 2007-09 and the Sandusky scandal. To have raised that kind of money in the face of those challenges is pretty amazing.

Below is a gallery of some photos I took at the finale in Eisenhower Auditorium.

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Tina Hay, editor

April 14, 2014 at 3:04 pm Leave a comment

Photos from Penn State Football’s ‘Signature Event’

Our pal Curtis Chan ’94, ’03g, who works over in the College of Engineering and who does a little sports photography on the side, took some photos for us last night in the Jordan Center, at the “Signature Event” that new football coach James Franklin staged to celebrate Penn State’s success on National Signing Day. We thought you might enjoy seeing some of them; here’s a quick slide show:

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Thanks for the images, Curtis!

Tina Hay, editor

February 6, 2014 at 5:47 pm Leave a comment

Penn State Wrestlers Dominate Ohio State

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Senior Ed Ruth returned to the lineup after a one-month suspension (that’s Ruth in the photo above), but it was a redshirt freshman—Zain Retherford—who stole the show Sunday afternoon as Penn State’s wrestlers dominated Ohio State, 31-6, in Rec Hall.

Retherford, at 141 pounds, knocked off top-ranked and previously unbeaten Logan Stieber, a two-time NCAA champion. The two wrestlers were tied at the end of regulation, and Retherford got a takedown in the sudden-victory period to win the match, 4-2. He liked that, and so did the crowd:

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The Lions lost only two bouts all afternoon. Among the bigger winners for Penn State were Nico Megaludis, who scored a technical fall in his 125-pound bout; David Taylor, who earned a technical fall at 165 pounds; and Matt Brown (174), Ed Ruth (184), and Jimmy Lawson (285), who all scored major decisions.

I’ve posted an album of photos from the dual on our Facebook page.

Tina Hay, editor

December 15, 2013 at 7:06 pm 1 comment

Adventures in Sports Photography: Wrestling, Part 2

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Somehow, I managed to let almost three years go by between the first time I photographed a Penn State wrestling dual and the second one. In January 2011, I shot the Penn State-Iowa dual in Rec Hall, and yesterday I spent the afternoon at the Bryce Jordan Center photographing the historic meet against Pitt.

Part of what was cool about yesterday’s meet was that the mat was on an elevated platform. Usually the wrestling takes place at floor level, and photographers have to either sit or kneel mat-side for the whole meet. (The really dedicated ones lie on their stomach to shoot.) I had brought one of those Crazy Creek folding portable camp chairs for back support, but when I walked in and saw the chest-high platform, I knew we were in for a different experience. The photographers spent the afternoon bellied up to the edge of the platform; some shot with their elbows on the platform, while others (more…)

December 9, 2013 at 5:47 pm 3 comments

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